from India Insight:

Ravi Shankar and the West’s search for the lost chord

December 12, 2012

There is a moment in the beginning of the Concert for Bangla Desh live album when sitar master Ravi Shankar and his fellow musicians play some notes on their Indian instruments. When they stop, the audience at Madison Square Garden applauds and cheers. "Thank you," Shankar said. "If you appreciate the tuning so much, I hope you will enjoy the playing more."

from India Insight:

Ravi Shankar, a song more felt than heard

December 12, 2012

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author, and not necessarily those of Thomson Reuters)

from Tales from the Trail:

Washington Extra – From Russia With(out) Love

November 16, 2010

Not a great day for US-Russia relations. The United States won the extradition of Russian arms dealer Viktor Bout from Thailand against Moscow’s vehement objections. The Russian government said the extradition of the man known as the “Merchant of Death” was not only illegal but also the result of “unprecedented political pressure from the United States.” Earlier this month we had news that a key Russian spymaster and double agent had defected to the United States after unmasking the spy ring here. And then to top it all off, Republicans signaled they would block ratification of the START Treaty this year.  It looks like more of a meltdown than a reset in US-Russia relations.

from Fan Fare:

Alan Parsons’ third act: instructional filmmaker

By Dean Goodman
September 30, 2010

Alan Parsons is perhaps best known for his work with the easy-listening progressive rock group that bears his name. Between 1976 and 1990, the Alan Parsons Project enjoyed eight top-40 singles in the United States, including the No. 3 smash "Eye in the Sky." But before he became a rock star, Parsons was a knob-twiddler at EMI's Abbey Road Studios in London. He was an assistant engineer on the Beatles' final albums "Let it Be" and "Abbey Road," and one of the brains behind the 1973 Pink Floyd opus "The Dark Side of the Moon," one of the biggest-selling albums of all time.
  
alan2Now resident in Santa Barbara, 95 miles northwest of Los Angeles, Parsons is trying his hand at instructional filmmaking. He has just released a three-disc DVD package that aims to lift "this mysterious veil of secrecy" that surrounds the recording experience, he said Wednesday.

from Oddly Enough Blog:

Imagine there’s no toilet, it’s easy if you try…

September 2, 2010

Blog Guy, the last sign of the approaching Apocalypse you told us about was singer Justin Bieber publishing his memoirs, but I believe there was another one this week that you overlooked.

from Oddly Enough Blog:

Goofy new attraction for Doughnut Day

June 4, 2010

OBAMA/

Blog Guy, did I read someplace that your Goofy Face Museum and Doughnut Shop is turning into a wax museum as well?

from Fan Fare:

The kids are all right as Beatles’ White Album gets a fresh coat

By Dean Goodman
May 10, 2010

The good thing about cuts to music education in schools is that wannabe rock stars flock to savvy entrepreneurs like Paul Green -- the Philadelphia musician who inspired the Jack Black movie "School of Rock." 

from Fan Fare:

Jeff Beck says Beatles “as good as George Martin allowed them to be”

By Dean Goodman
April 23, 2010

The Beatles probably would have gone down in history as a pretty good bar band had it not been for their producer George Martin, according to Jeff Beck. The guitar virtuoso, who worked with the studio wizard on a pair of acclaimed albums in the 1970s, said on Thursday the Beatles were "as good as George Martin allowed them to be."

from Fan Fare:

Ringo Starr gets his Hollywood star at low-wattage ceremony

By Dean Goodman
February 9, 2010

If the stars come out at night, they failed to illuminate Ringo Starr's Hollywood Walk of Fame induction ceremony on Monday, the first time a star has been unveiled at night.

from Fan Fare:

Ringo Starr: “I’m the greatest”

By Dean Goodman
January 20, 2010

After more than 50 years in the music business -- eight of them in the most scrutinized band on the planet -- Ringo Starr would rather do anything than submit to even more questions. But the former Beatles drummer has a new solo album to promote, and that means more interviews -- most recently at the Grammy Museum in Los Angeles on Tuesday, when he took part in a Q&A and mini concert for about 230 fans.