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from Changing China:

Snapshot Beijing, 3: Usain Bolt’s victory in the 100m

Bolt snapshot

At the 1988 Olympics in Seoul. I shall never forget sitting in the front row and watching Ben Johnson hurtling towards the finish line in the 100 metres and then raising his hand aloft in an almost contemptuous "I am Number One" gesture.

Twenty years later, sitting -- lucky me -- in the front row again, my indelible memory of the Beijing Games will always be that magical last 100 metres when Usain Bolt looked left and right, spread his arms wide and thumped his chest for sheer joy.

He was glorifying in his talent, treasuring a moment that he would relive for the rest of his life. So will I.  

Kevin Fylan adds: This is the third in our series of snapshots from the Beijing Games, where Reuters reporters give their thoughts on what it was like to be there at the key moments of the Olympics.

from Changing China:

Redeem team brings it home for the U.S.

redeem team

After watching the United States destroy every opponent in the basketball tournament by an average of more than 30 points before the final on Sunday, there probably weren't many people expecting Spain to have a chance against a "Redeem Team" determined to win back the gold medal after the debacle of the bronze in 2004.

But then Spain played a superb match and kept the Americans on the ropes all the way to the very end with one dazzling basket after another.

from Changing China:

Beckham hits Beijing

Beckham applaudsAs if any more glitz was needed at the Beijing Olympics, David Beckham flew into China at the weekend to promote the 2012 Games in London.

The former England captain has millions of fans in China. He will appear in the Bird's Nest at the Olympics closing ceremony tonight, kicking a ball into the crowd from a red double-decker bus to symbolise the handover to London.

from Changing China:

Kenya, Ethiopia reap rewards from hard work

Dibaba leads the packDespite setbacks ahead of the Beijing Olympic Games, Kenya will leave Beijing in glory after capturing 5 gold medals, 5 silvers and four bronze in distance running.

Kenya's hope for an Olympic marathon medal were dealt a blow when Robert Cheruiyot pulled out due to injury and three-times London marathon winner Martin Lel's training was affected by flu. But Sammy Wanjiru saved the day and brought the marathon gold medal, proof that distance running is Africa's forte.

from Changing China:

Some sounds are there to be savoured

headers and volleysSimon Denyer blogged this week about the cheesy American rock music that has drowned out so many moments of quiet at these Games. What's so wrong with the sound of silence, he asked?

Well, there are some sounds at the Games that have been worth hearing, especially if you've been lucky enough to get as close to the action as we have.

from Changing China:

Snapshot Beijing, 2: Matthias Steiner

Steiner

Continuing our look at the golden moments from the Games, Sophie Hardach tells us what it was like watching the heart-wrenching story of weightlifter Matthias Steiner unfold.

Sophie writes:

After covering 14 Olympic weightlifting competitions, I sat down for the super-heavyweight contest knowing that it would be the most spectacular of them all. In the previous contests, I had seen hulking strongmen in tears, had watched lifters crash to the floor under the barbell, had heard caveman howls and primal screams.

from Changing China:

Story of day 15: Mitcham’s amazing dive

Mitcham dives

Matthew Mitcham did two surprising things in Beijing. He scooped a gold medal from the apparently invincible Chinese diving team and told anyone who asked that he is gay.

Mitcham broke down in tears after a nearly perfect last dive edged him above the Chinese favourite into top place. It was the eighth and last medal in a sport that the host nation utterly dominates and was expected to sweep.

from Changing China:

Does soccer belong at the Olympics?

Messi

FIFA president Sepp Blatter says he does not see any need to change the format of the Olympic soccer tournament, which is restricted to under-23 teams and allows each to field up to three overage players.

Many people, however, feel that soccer is something of an unwelcome gatecrasher at the Games and that not bringing its top players is rather like turning up at the party with a bottle of cheap plonk.

from Changing China:

Spare a thought for He in gymnastics row (Update)

He KexinWhatever the results of the investigation into the date of birth of He Kexin, China's double Olympic gold medallist, I hope we don't lose sight of the fact that even in the event of any subterfuge the gymnast herself would not be the one to blame.

The International Olympic Committee has asked the gymnastics federation to check He's date of birth of following claims that she might be under the minimum age to compete.

from Changing China:

A costly kick to the head

A kick to the head

Cuba's Angel Valodia Matos was banned for life from taekwondo on Saturday after he kicked the match referee in the head in his bronze medal bout.

Matos's coach was also banned for the behaviour that the official said was in "strong violation of the spirit of taekwondo and the Olympic Games".

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