from The Great Debate:

Are too-big-to-fail banks being cut down to size?

By Charles R. Morris
August 7, 2014

Financial institution representatives are sworn in before testifying at the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington

The massive $16-billion mortgage fraud settlement agreement just reached by Bank of America and federal authorities -- only the latest in a string of such settlements -- makes it easy to lose sight of what good shape banks are in.

from Anatole Kaletsky:

Yellen’s remarkably unremarkable news conference – and why it’s a good thing

By Anatole Kaletsky
June 19, 2014

Yellen holds a news conference following two-day Federal Open Market Committee meeting at the Federal Reserve in WashingtonJohn Maynard Keynes famously said that his highest ambition was to make economic policy as boring as dentistry. In this respect, as in so many others, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen is proving to be a loyal Keynesian.

from Nicholas Wapshott:

Yellen shows her hand

By Nicholas Wapshott
April 19, 2014

The difference between the Federal Reserve Board of Chairwoman Janet Yellen and that of her immediate predecessor Ben Bernanke is becoming clear. No more so than in their approach to the problem of joblessness.

from Anatole Kaletsky:

Yellen looks toward a Keynesian approach

By Anatole Kaletsky
February 13, 2014

This has been a banner week for the world economy, inspired largely by events in the United States.

from Nicholas Wapshott:

On jobs: Be bold, Obama

By Nicholas Wapshott
February 3, 2014

President Barack Obama’s State of the Union was all about jobs. He said the word 23 times, often congratulating himself on having helped create 4 million. He urged a “year of action” to make more jobs, raise wages and create opportunities for social mobility. Then he set out on a jobs tour to persuade large companies to start hiring and pay more.

from Anatole Kaletsky:

A central banker’s ‘license to lie’

By Anatole Kaletsky
January 30, 2014

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke, who retires this week as the world’s most powerful central banker, cannot be trusted.

from Counterparties:

Morning Bid — The Minutiae of the Minutes

January 8, 2014

December’s last salvo before going into holiday mode was the surprise Federal Reserve decision to trim its monthly $85 billion in bond buying to a more modest (but still enormous) $75 billion, that helped balloon its balance sheet to north of $4 trillion.

from Anatole Kaletsky:

Have markets finally received Bernanke’s taper message?

By Anatole Kaletsky
December 19, 2013

Thanks goodness it’s over. Financial market behavior ahead of last night’s announcement by Ben Bernanke on a gradual reduction in U.S. monetary stimulus has been tedious and irritating, rather like listening to whining children in the back of the car on a long journey: “Daddy, are we there yet?” In fact, impatient whining about when the Fed might start to “taper” has spoiled for many investors what should have been one of the most enjoyable financial journeys of all time, scaling previously unexplored market peaks and passing through unprecedented monetary vistas.

from Nicholas Wapshott:

The strange convergence of Bernanke, Hayek and Bitcoin

By Nicholas Wapshott
November 21, 2013

Every time Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke opens his mouth, the markets move. But few could have guessed that in an offhand remark he would  add legitimacy to the Bitcoin, the virtual currency that competes with the American dollar as a reserve currency and an international trading medium.

from Nicholas Wapshott:

Hooray for inflation

By Nicholas Wapshott
November 13, 2013

There have been some extraordinary headlines in recent days. Here’s the Economist: “The perils of falling inflation.” Here’s the Financial Times: “The eurozone needs to get inflation up again.”