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from Unstructured Finance:

‘Bond King’ Gross speaks to 700 at Pimco client event in Big Apple

By Jennifer Ablan

Bill Gross did something last week he rarely does -- venture from his Newport Beach, Calif. home to meet with investors twice. 

First in Chicago at the Morningstar Investment Conference where he made waves for donning sunglasses and joking he'd become "a 70-year-old version of Justin Bieber," and then, the next day at a less-publicized event for 700 clients in New York City. 

The meetings are a sign that Gross, dubbed the market's "Bond King," is trying to make amends with investors and the media after a brutal first half of the year. 

Last Friday, Gross gave a keynote address and took some questions at Pimco's annual investment summit in the Big Apple, which was the largest Pimco-hosted client event in its history with over 700 institutional investors and clients, Doug Hodge, ceo of Pacific Investment Management Co. told Reuters.
At Friday's event, Hodge spoke reverentially about Gross, describing him in visionary language one might reserve for a great inventor or artist.
"Time after time, Bill has broken with conventional wisdom as he has seen opportunities where others have not, and he has been prepared to put it on the line, over and over again, and it has been this process of taking measured risk that has led to extraordinary long-term benefits to you, our clients," Hodge said.
Gross is facing no shortage of investor attention.
Pimco's flagship Total Return Fund, the world's largest bond fund run by Gross with $229 billion in assets under management, saw net outflows totaling $15.67 billion for the year-to-date ending May and subpar performance.
Gross, co-founder of Newport Beach, California-based Pimco, has also been under intense scrutiny since his public falling out with El-Erian and news reports about Gross's demanding and sometimes abrasive management style.
But for its part, Gross's performance at his Pimco Total Return Fund is showing some signs of stabilization.
In the 12 months ending last Friday, the Pimco Total Return Fund, which has $229 billion in assets under management, is now beating its benchmark Barclays U.S. Aggregate Bond Index by 32 basis points, Hodge pointed out.
"At the end of the day, Pimco and Bill Gross should be judged by the value that we deliver to our clients. That's the test," Hodge told Reuters in an interview. "Through the Total Return Fund and other strategies, Bill has created more value for more investors than anyone in the history of our industry."
The half-day summit on Friday featured Gross but also showcased Pimco's new deputy chief investment officers and Rich Clarida, Pimco's global strategic advisor.
After the client event, Gross also did a town hall meeting with employees in Pimco's offices, which was also attended by several hundreds of personnel, a Pimco spokesman said. Pimco declined to comment on what Gross discussed at Friday's client and employee events.
While many say Gross appears more engaged with colleagues, some institutional investors are still waiting for a turnaround in his performance.
The Pimco Total Return Fund's three-year Sharpe ratio – a measure closely followed by pension funds, foundations and endowments -- is hovering around 1.02. That is trailing the Barclays Aggregate at 1.24 and the average intermediate-term bond fund category at 1.26 (The higher a fund's Sharpe ratio, the better a fund's returns have been relative to the risk it has taken on).
Hodge added: "Generating alpha is more than simply buying and selling bonds, it is about breaking with conventional wisdom and ultimately about putting yourself on the line."

from Breakingviews:

When denials can be as instructive as the truth

By Rob Cox
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Denials can be as instructive as truths – and if not, they can be at least more entertaining. On Thursday a fellow fingered as the father of bitcoin rejected a report he founded the crypto-currency. In the shadowy world of virtual money, such confusion may not be so surprising – nor matter. Not so with the bizarre defiance of $2 trillion “Bond King” Bill Gross.

from Unstructured Finance:

Obama hearts El-Erian

By Sam Forgione and Matthew Goldstein

OK, so it's not a big gig like being nominated to head the Treasury Dept. But President Obama's decision to tap PIMCO's Mohamed El-Erian to head the President's Global Development Council is no insignificant matter.

As the co-chief investment officer of the giant bond shop founded by Bill Gross, El-Erian is seen as the eventual heir apparent to run the Newport Beach, Calif firm. And El-Erian increasingly has become one of PIMCO's most visible faces---maybe even more than Gross himself these days--when it comes to talking about what ails the U.S. and global economies.

from MuniLand:

The fiscal cliff and “budgetary crystal meth”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Want to scare yourself a little? Bill Gross, who runs one of the world’s largest bond mutual funds, says that U.S. Treasuries are losing their status as the top global asset. Bloomberg has the story (emphasis mine):

Gross wrote in his monthly investment commentary last week that the U.S. will no longer be the first destination of global capital in search of safe returns unless fiscal spending and debt growth slows, saying the nation “frequently pleasures itself with budgetary crystal meth.”

from Unstructured Finance:

Gundlach doesn’t whine over his stolen wine

By Jennifer Ablan and Matthew Goldstein

Who said bonds are boring? In recent days, Jeffrey Gundlach, the new king of the fixed-income world, has been dominating headlines with his lengthy CNBC interview on everything from counterparty risk to the market’s love affair with Apple stock to talk in the blogosphere about Gundlach’s pricey Santa Monica, Calif. residence being burglarized of more than $10 million in assets.

Against this backdrop, Gundlach’s firm, DoubleLine, hit a huge milestone this week as well, hitting $45 billion in assets under management.

from Bethany McLean:

The Pension Destabilization Act

From the wonder of the Olympics to the horror of Libor, there’s been plenty of news this summer. So maybe it’s not surprising that a 1,676-page bill called Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century, which President Obama signed into law on July 6, has escaped attention. (Really? You’d rather watch Gabby Douglas win the all-around gold than read this bill? Shocking.) But buried within the bill, which is also known as the Highway Act, is a provision that matters to many Americans, a provision that sums up a lot of what’s wrong with Washington today, a provision that is not just bad finance but also reeks of the cronyism we should all fear.

The provision is called the Pension Stabilization Act, and really, it should be renamed the Pension Destabilization Act. Pensions are fairly unstable already, relying on markets of the future that smart prognosticators doubt are going to be as generous as the markets of the past. And yet, many pension plans are counting on similar rates of return anyway. In his August letter, Pimco’s Bill Gross pointed out that one of the country’s largest state pension funds says it will earn what sounds like a modest real rate of 4.75 percent. But as Gross notes, assuming a portion of that is in bonds yielding 1 to 2 percent, the pension would need stocks to return 7 to 8 percent after adjusting for inflation to hit its target. That is, as Gross writes, “very heavy lifting.” Nor are we heading into tough times with a cushion. Different sources put the funding deficit for large corporate pension plans at somewhere between $475 billion and $500 billion as of the end of 2011.

from Unstructured Finance:

UF Weekend reads – The PIMCO edition

Jenn Ablan likes to tell me that people are always writing about PIMCO and Bill Gross, the long reigning "king of bonds." And when you think of it there's a lot of truth to that assertion.

Gross' mammoth $263 billion Total Return Fund gets endless coverage because--by its very size--it really is the bond market. It's one reason why so much ink is spilled whenever the Total Return Fund has a month where investors pull more money out of the fund than put in.  And it's why there's so much analysis of what Gross & Co. are doing with Treasuries and mortgage-backed securities--and whether they are using lots of leverage and derivatives to boost exposures.

from Unstructured Finance:

PIMCO and BlackRock go strolling down K Street

By Jennifer Ablan and Matthew Goldstein

Wall Street may hate financial regulatory reform, but lobbyists certainly love it—especially ones working on behalf of giant asset managers PIMCO and BlackRock, which control a total of nearly $5 trillion in assets.

Last year, PIMCO and BlackRock both upped their lobbying expenditures in a big way.

from Unstructured Finance:

Paul after PIMCO

 

By Jennifer Ablan and Matthew Goldstein

Paul McCulley says working at bond giant PIMCO was like being in Camelot. But in some ways, Bill Gross’s former top Federal Reserve watcher seems a lot happier and more at peace with himself since leaving the Newport Beach, Calif.-based firm at the end of 2010.

These days McCulley, who is credited with coining the phrase “shadow banking” to describe the role Wall Street banks and hedge funds play in pumping liquidity into the financial system, looks more like a professor at some liberal arts college than a once mighty money manager of some $50 billion.

from Unstructured Finance:

Gross miscalculation?

By Jennifer Ablan and Matthew Goldstein

It appears that Bill Gross's PIMCO Total Return Fund is losing ground with investors -- just not as fast as we originally thought.

Morningstar, the mutual-fund tracker, initially told us that PIMCO's flagship fund had suffered $17 billion in net outflows over the last 12 months. It turns out Morningstar discovered this morning that it miscalculated and the figure actually is $10.3 billion.

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