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Reuters blog archive

from Photographers' Blog:

Meet Miss Malini

Mumbai, India

By Vivek Prakash

Where I live is not the India of most people's imaginations or memories, and it's hardly the India I once knew as a kid.

My Mumbai has easygoing cafes, organic markets, swish malls, expensive restaurants serving great food and wine, fabulous nightclubs and raucous house parties. The idea that this India is any less "real" than bad infrastructure or the world of Slumdog Millionaire is misguided.

India has many crosses to bear - I acknowledge that. I'll be the first one to complain about crumbling roads, horrid traffic, corrupt politicians, impossible bureaucracy and the gulf between rich and poor. But you'd better get used to the idea that slowly but surely, generational change is taking place. My Mumbai is probably the India of the future.

When I'm outside this country and I tell people I live in Mumbai, their first response is usually a mix of bewilderment and concern - I assume this is from the reputation it has as a glorified dump with quaint colorful traditions, best cliched in popular movies like Slumdog and Monsoon Wedding and books like Shantaram and Beyond the Beautiful Forevers which mostly deal with life in the slums. The initial reaction is usually followed up with something like "you must love it as a photographer." Yes, I suppose I do - it's a magical dump of over a billion, easy fodder for lazy pictures of beggars at car windows and smiling street kids.

from Entrepreneurial:

Does Posterous have staying power?

posterousSachin Agarwal created Posterous as a way for his parents to be able to see what he posted online. Two years later the blog publishing tool has more than 15 million monthly users, but experts still wonder whether its ultra simple functionality can catapult it into the rarefied air of Facebook or Twitter.

"No one has solved the problem of how does my 60-year-old dad see my photos," said Agarwal, who launched his San Francisco, California-based technology startup two years ago with friend and former Stanford University alum Garry Tan. He said it was important for him that Posterous appealed to people who may be intimidated by the terms "blogging" and "social media." "We don't want to be thought of as a tech toy for Silicon Valley geeks. We're surrounded by a lot of crazy tech, but our goal is to be so much more universal and applicable to normal people."

from The Great Debate UK:

The 2010 general election and new media

parliamentMatthew McGregor is the Director Blue State Digital’s London office. The opinions expressed are his own.

The 2010 general election will be the first closely British election in which the internet will be an important factor. The last truly close election in 1992 was fought in a way unrecognisable to campaigners today. In 1997, most of us had yet to use email. In 2005, YouTube was barely three months into its existence.

from Funds Hub:

Icahn’t: Carl says no time for blogging, too little interest

DEAL/Could Carl's silence be golden?

Our favorite billionaire blogger and corporate raider Carl Icahn is safely avoiding writer's cramp. His Icahn Report, launched to much fanfare as a hub for corporate governance  and reform, has not been updated since April 16.

Reuters caught up with Icahn this week to discuss his intervention in CIT's attempted rescue. The legendary investor threw a bomb into the lender's efforts to strike a debt swap deal with its creditors, and to stay in business through a reorganization plan, by offering a $6 billion loan. Asked about the lack of production on his blog, Icahn explained he's been fully engaged this year:

from MediaFile:

Sniper-blogger grills Taiwan reporters

"Even Reuters' Ralph Jennings -- of whom I've been extremely critical for getting the story very wrong when it comes to Taiwan -- tells us that 'half a million' attended the protest," a blogger wrote in October after seeing the Reuters's write-up of an opposition-led demonstration in Taipei against President Ma Ying-jeou.

China claims sovereignty over self-ruled Taiwan. Ma, Taiwan's president, likes China. The opposition and the blogger don't like either.

from MediaFile:

Huffington Post top indy political blog for traffic

obamamccain.jpgPolitical Web sites and blogs compete for scoops and eyeballs with an intensity rivaling the presidential candidates, so the Internet traffic figures released Wednesday by industry tracker comScore are likely to provide some bragging rights.

The winner is... HuffingtonPost.com  -- founded by commentator Arianna Huffington, the site led among stand-alone political blogs and news sites with 4.5 million visitors in September, comScore said. That was way above the site's tally of 792,000 in the same month last year.

from MediaFile:

Death comes for the archblogger

Matt RichtelAt the risk of stating the obvious, everybody's blogging about New York Times reporter Matt Richtel's story about how the stress of 24-7 blogging is thinning the herd of Internet scribes.

Here's his evidence:

Two weeks ago in North Lauderdale, Fla., funeral services were held for Russell Shaw, a prolific blogger on technology subjects who died at 60 of a heart attack. In December, another tech blogger, Marc Orchant, died at 50 of a massive coronary. A third, Om Malik, 41, survived a heart attack in December.

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