from Jim Gaines:

Teddy Roosevelt v. Citizens United

October 16, 2014

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How is it possible that, given overwhelming public concern about the direction of the country, we could be facing historically low turnout in the midterm elections on Nov. 4?

from Jim Gaines:

A constitutional amendment to take Big Money out of politics dies quietly

September 12, 2014

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This week the U.S. Senate considered a constitutional amendment that would have allowed Congress and state legislatures to limit the power of money in politics. The debate was not much covered in the media because the outcome was so predictable. But the party-line vote that killed it should not go unnoted.

from Breakingviews:

James Hoffa: Let sun shine on corporate donations

By Guest Contributor
May 29, 2014

By James Hoffa
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews guest columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from The Great Debate:

Roberts Court: Easier to donate, harder to vote

By Elizabeth B. Wydra
April 4, 2014

Chief Justice John Roberts’ first sentence of his majority opinion in McCutcheon v. Federal Elections Commission, striking down important limits on campaign contributions, declares “There is no right more basic in our democracy than the right to participate in electing our political leaders.”

from Jack Shafer:

My secret plan for all that new campaign cash!

By Jack Shafer
April 3, 2014

The campaign finance decision the Supreme Court delivered Wednesday stirred all the same responses from all the same sources, with the anti-money faction bellowing that the Roberts court had now completed its plan -- hatched with 2010's Citizens United ruling --  to put democracy up for sale. The pro-money crowd (to which I belong, by the way), heralded SCOTUS's latest call as a victory for free speech.

from The Great Debate:

McCutcheon: Should the rich speak louder?

By Jeffrey Rosen
April 3, 2014

On Wednesday, the Supreme Court handed down its most important decision on campaign finance reform since Citizens United. The decision, McCutcheon v. Federal Election Commission, seemed to divide along familiar ideological lines, with Chief Justice John Roberts writing the majority opinion for five conservatives and Justice Stephen Breyer, writing the dissent for the four liberals.

from The Great Debate:

Making every voter equal

By Jonathan Soros
February 26, 2014

The venture capitalist Tom Perkins recently suggested that he should have a greater voice than others in selecting our government because he’s rich. “You pay a million dollars in taxes,” he told the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco, “you get a million votes. How’s that?”

from The Great Debate:

What’s behind JPMorgan’s push for worker training?

January 8, 2014

Just a few weeks before federal prosecutors announced a nearly $2 billion settlement with JPMorgan Chase over Bernie Madoff’s fraudulent accounts, chairman and chief executive officer Jamie Dimon sat alongside former Congressman and White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel at an Aspen Institute forum in the biology lab of Malcolm X College to tout the embattled bank's five-year, $250 million, multi-city investment in job training. The bank would commit $15 million for “workplace readiness and demand-driven training” in Chicago.

from The Great Debate:

The Supreme Court ‘s Gilded Age redux

By Richard White
August 14, 2013

The Supreme Court belongs to the small club whose members seem to assume that saying something makes it so. It deals in precedents -- not the same thing as dealing in history. It prefers obiter dicta to the messiness of the past.

from Breakingviews:

Election reveals clear calculus: 47 pct > 1 pct

November 9, 2012

By Jeffrey Goldfarb
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.