from Photographers' Blog:

Wigs for smiles

By Rodrigo Garrido
November 17, 2014

Santiago, Chile

By Rodrigo Garrido

Marcelo Avatte, a renowned Italian-Chilean hair stylist, could have never imagined that his own son would motivate him to start making and donating natural hair wigs for children who suffer from cancer.

from Stories I’d like to see:

How much money is raised and spent in fighting cancer?

By Steven Brill
September 9, 2014

Actress Paltrow is interviewed as she arrives for the fourth biennial Stand Up To Cancer fundraising telecast in Hollywood

1. Cancer money:

The Stand Up to Cancer telethon -- simulcast Friday night on all four major broadcast networks and 28 cable channels, and live-streamed on Yahoo and Hulu (available on YouTube here) -- reminded me of a story I have long wanted to read: How much money is being spent on cancer research, where is it going and how well is it being spent?

from Photographers' Blog:

Heshan: a poisonous legacy

June 24, 2014

Heshan, China

By Jason Lee

Heshan, a village with a population of about 1,500 in China’s Hunan province, is sometimes given the grim label: “cancer village”.

from Cancer in Context:

Remembering Debra Sherman

By Stephen Adler
April 23, 2014

It is with great sorrow that we learned that our much beloved and admired colleague, Debra Sherman, died yesterday morning in Chicago after battling lung cancer for more than a year. Deb’s signature mix of humor and moxie made her a fierce reporter and wonderful friend to so many of her colleagues around the world. She covered healthcare for more than a decade, breaking news on the medical device industry and writing considered pieces on such subjects as the rising financial toll posed by a cancer diagnosis.

from The Great Debate:

How Big Pharma is slowing cancer research

By Carlos Moreno
March 31, 2014

In a March 27 article in the New England Journal of Medicine, a team led by physicians at Massachusetts General Hospital revealed that a new cancer drug from Novartis has shown exciting clinical results in a small trial of lung cancer patients. While additional trials are necessary before the drug can obtain approval from the Food and Drug Administration, this type of success story demonstrates why research to develop new cancer therapies is critically important.

from Cancer in Context:

Hiring a cancer survivor

February 7, 2014

Today’s employment report from the U.S. Labor Department showed the job market remained tough in January. If it’s difficult for healthy individuals to get a job, what is it like for cancer survivors?

from Cancer in Context:

Cancer wrecks your body, even some friendships

January 22, 2014

Much as cancer can cause skin to lose its suppleness, hair its sheen, and the body its vigor, it can also wreck some friendships.

from Cancer in Context:

Unnecessary palpitations over palliative care

January 17, 2014

The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) said it best when it declared in its December 13, 2013, issue that “palliative care suffers from an identity problem.”

from The Great Debate:

The fierce fight over how to die

By Anne Taylor Fleming
January 15, 2014

There has been an ugly and sad pile-on by two people who ought to know better and a young woman fighting against cancer. It started -- as these things can -- in the blogosphere, where Lisa Bonchek Adams, mother of three and terminal cancer patient, has been chronicling her battles in sometimes raw detail.

from Cancer in Context:

Pain and addiction

January 10, 2014

Pain arrived for another too-long visit recently, so I called on my palliative care doctor to get relief. Pain has been an exhausting, debilitating aspect of my cancer, affecting me primarily in my ribcage, on the right side. This is the site where my stage 4 lung cancer first was diagnosed. If it weren’t for the pain I felt in my ribs I never would have known I had cancer, and it's still my only symptom.