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from India Insight:

No consensus on sex, violence and censorship in Bollywood

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not necessarily of Reuters)

Getting directors, producers and activists into a room to figure out Indian cinema's connection to violence toward women, rape and crudeness in society can be like a family gathering. People shout, get angry and fail to solve fundamental problems because they can't agree on anything.

The Siri Fort auditorium in New Delhi recently presented the latest forum for the debate. India's Ministry of Information and Broadcasting held a six-day festival there to celebrate 100 years of moviemaking, and there was little agreement on how much responsibility Bollywood and the film industry bear for the poor attitude toward women that many people evince. It was perhaps a more pressing discussion than usual, given the name of the three-day workshop, "Cut-Uncut," which dealt with official censorship in India, the role of sex and violence in movies and the influence of films on society.

To be fair, it's a question with no apparent answers. Indian films are wildly popular. Storylines and songs become part of the thread of everyday life in a way that's different than nearly everywhere else in the world. They also reflect a strange prudishness when it comes to love scenes with dance numbers as a substitute - strange because the dance numbers can seem infinitely more erotic than any kiss on the lips or lovemaking scene that they're supposed to be representing.

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