from Jack Shafer:

Dear Obama, spare us the press-freedom lecturing

By Jack Shafer
January 31, 2014

Wearing his best straight face, White House Press Secretary Jay Carney lectured China on press freedom yesterday. In a redundant official statement, he accused Beijing of restricting "the ability of journalists to do their work" and "imped[ing] their ability to do their jobs."

from Breakingviews:

Doubly dysfunctional press hinders China cleanup

November 11, 2013

By John Foley

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Jack Shafer:

Governments worldwide buried in the Snowden avalanche

By Jack Shafer
November 7, 2013

If the U.S. and British governments could stop the press from publishing stories based on the National Security Agency files leaked by Edward Snowden in June, they probably would have acted by now. Oh, the Guardian was coerced by the British government into destroying the hard drives in London containing the leaked files, and London police used terrorism law to detain the partner of Glenn Greenwald -- one of the journalists to whom Snowden leaked -- at Heathrow Airport and confiscated computer media believed to contain leaked files.

from John Lloyd:

China’s great firewall grows ever higher

By John Lloyd
October 22, 2013

This week I was scheduled to attend a seminar on new and social media in China with other British journalists, but first I needed a visa. It never came. Consular officials told me that I was denied entrance because I didn’t have an appropriate letter of invitation -- but others in my party traveled with the same documentation that I provided.

from India Insight:

Indian television getting too hot to handle

May 28, 2013

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not necessarily of Reuters)

from Breakingviews:

Review: Censors are still China’s newsmakers

February 1, 2013

By Katrina Hamlin

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

from India Insight:

“Vishwaroopam” touches yet another Indian nerve

January 31, 2013

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author, and not necessarily of Reuters)

from The Great Debate:

Social media and the new Cold War

By Philip N. Howard
August 1, 2012

There is a new Cold War starting. It does not involve opposing military forces, but it does involve competing ideas about how political life should be organized. The battles are between broadcast media outlets and social-media upstarts, which have very different approaches to news production, ownership and censorship. And some of the biggest battles are in Russia, where the ruling elites that dominate broadcast media are pitted against the civil society groups that flourish through social media.

from India Insight:

Cleaning up TV’s dirty pictures

June 25, 2012

I was watching a documentary on Greta Garbo on television. The film was in English with English subtitles for people more comfortable following written English than quick spoken English. Every time the word "sex" or something related to it would come up, the subtitles avoided it. "Heterosexual" became "hetero." "Her sexuality" became "her femininity." Dedicated channel surfing revealed similar evasions. In a conversation about breast cancer on an English channel, the station inserted an asterisk to partially mask the word "breast" in the subtitles, even though you could hear it onscreen.

from Anthony De Rosa:

Lingering concerns about Twitter’s censorship policy

By Anthony De Rosa
January 31, 2012

There's a bit of a debate going about whether Twitter's new censorship policy is reasonable or not. My colleague Paul Smalera wrote one of the better posts leaning toward Twitter's policy having some merits, in the way it makes it easier for those outside censoring countries to see what's being censored. But I also see some flaws with this, which Boing Boing's Xeni Jardin helped me realize. She calls it "a polite step down a slippery slope"