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from Alison Frankel:

Criminal defense lawyers’ group: no reason to shun Koch Industries’ money

On Wednesday, the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers announced a major new grant to fund training for lawyers who represent indigent defendants. That's no surprise. Providing good lawyers for defendants who can't afford counsel is a core mission for NACDL. But the source of the funding caused a bit of a stir: Koch Industries, the Kansas-based, privately held manufacturing conglomerate that is the source of the boundless wealth of Charles and David Koch. The Koch brothers, as you surely know, contribute so lavishly to Republican candidates and conservative causes that the Senate's Democratic majority leader, Harry Reid, has tagged them (via Talking Points Memo) "'un-American' plutocrats who 'have no conscience and are willing to lie' in order to 'rig the system' against the middle class."

So why is NACDL, a group dedicated to defending the downtrodden, in bed with two of America's richest and most powerful conservative ideologues?

NACDL's president told me the group only cares that Koch Industries shares its view of the sanctity of the Sixth Amendment and defendants' constitutional right to counsel. Koch placed no conditions on its contribution - the amount hasn't been disclosed - and deferred to NACDL on the best way to spend the money. Under those circumstances, NACDL president Theodore Simon said in an interview, there was no reason to look askance at the Koch money. "We have to get beyond the corrosive idea that we have to agree with others on everything in order to cooperate on anything," he said. "This grant is going to help lawyers help the needy in our society."

Simon doggedly refused to veer off of his Sixth Amendment message in our conversation. He declined to discuss NACDL's relationship with Koch Industries, which dates back to at least 2011, when the group honored Koch general counsel Mark Holden for his ongoing support. He also declined to say whether NACDL approached Koch for the new contribution and declined to name his group's other donors. I emailed half a dozen current NACDL board members; the only one who got back to me referred me to Simon. I also emailed a Koch Industries representative but she was traveling and not immediately available.

from The Great Debate:

Elites focus on inequality; real people just want growth

kochs & warrenThe economic debate is now sharply focused on the issue of income inequality. That may not be the debate Democrats want to have, however. It's negative and divisive. Democrats would be better off talking about growth -- a hopeful and unifying agenda.

Democrats believe income inequality is a populist cause. But it may be less of a populist issue than an issue promoted by the cultural elite: well-educated professionals who are economically comfortable but not rich. There’s new evidence that ordinary voters care more about growth.

from The Great Debate:

Boehner: The fight to hold the party line

U.S. House Speaker Boehner holds a news conference at the Republican National Committee offices in Washington

In his latest attempt to impose discipline on his famously disorderly Republican caucus, House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) chose the soft power of public mockery over the more militant promise of private retribution. Speaking at an event in his home state, Boehner lashed out at fellow Republicans who have stymied immigration reform. “Here’s the attitude,” Boehner said of his recalcitrant colleagues. ‘Oooh, don’t make me do this. Oooh, this is too hard.’ ”

He spoke not in his usual solemn tones but with a high, child-like pitch, suggesting that his tormentors were in need of adult supervision.

from Stories I’d like to see:

Obama’s unaccountable briefers, pipeline bribery, and economic woes at Yankee Stadium

 

1. Obama’s unaccountable briefers:

Here’s a key paragraph in Saturday’s New York Times report explaining the Obama administration’s decision to delay yet again a decision on the Keystone pipeline:

’The Nebraska Supreme Court decision could lead to changes in the pipeline route, and it’s important to have that information and better understand that route, because it could have implications for environmental, socioeconomic and cultural impacts of the pipeline,’ a State Department official said Friday in a conference call with reporters that was conducted on the condition that the official not be named.

from Reihan Salam:

What the GOP can learn from the Koch brothers

 

Republicans are very enthusiastic about this year’s midterm congressional elections, and it is easy to see why. Obamacare, the president’s signature domestic policy legislation, remains unpopular. Turnout during midterm elections skews older and whiter than turnout during presidential elections, and Republicans tend to fare better among older and whiter voters.

And then there is the fact that Democrats are defending a number of Senate seats in states that tend to back Republican presidential candidates. Nate Silver, the editor of FiveThirtyEight, best known for his eerily good job predicting the outcome of the 2012 presidential election, forecasts that Republicans will retake the Senate.

from Stories I’d like to see:

A fair view of the Koch brothers, and explaining bitcoin

1. Getting a full, fair view of the money behind the Democrats’ prime enemies:

Their company makes everything from Dixie Cups to Brawny paper towels to Lycra swimwear to a huge share of the plywood, lumber and other products used in construction. It operates 4,000 miles of energy pipelines, according to its website, and an array of oil refineries that can process 670,000 barrels of oil a day.

from The Great Debate:

When excessive wealth meets dysfunctional politics

The election is months away but figuratively, at least, the billionaires are voting early and often.

Paul Singer and Art Pope, and, of course, the brothers Charles and David Koch are busy punching ballots for the Republicans; George Soros and Tom Steyer, meanwhile, are arranging votes for the Democrats, or at least most of them, since Steyer, an environmental advocate, is focusing of climate change. Their minions are not, however, literally buying votes -- the way Gilded Age operatives for George Hearst or Leland Stanford used to do.

from The Great Debate:

What the IRS should be scrutinizing

President Barack Obama, making a statement at the White House, announced that the Internal Revenue Service acting commissioner had been ousted, May 15, 2013. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

The tempest about the Tea Parties and the Internal Revenue Service is a gift for the Republican Party — and one that obscures the real issues.

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