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Reuters blog archive

from Stories I’d like to see:

How much money is raised and spent in fighting cancer?

Actress Paltrow is interviewed as she arrives for the fourth biennial Stand Up To Cancer fundraising telecast in Hollywood

1. Cancer money:

The Stand Up to Cancer telethon -- simulcast Friday night on all four major broadcast networks and 28 cable channels, and live-streamed on Yahoo and Hulu (available on YouTube here) -- reminded me of a story I have long wanted to read: How much money is being spent on cancer research, where is it going and how well is it being spent?

This story, from the CBS Los Angeles affiliate, reports, “Stand Up to Cancer was established in 2008 by film and media leaders as a new collaborative model of cancer research.

“More than $261 million has been pledged to support its programs,” the report continued, adding that the organization “has funded 12 teams of researchers, two transnational research teams and 26 young scientists.”

A story from the Associated Press reported that organizers said $109 million was raised from Friday’s event.

from Ian Bremmer:

Chinese leader’s reforms are bad news for Hong Kong

RTR45877.jpg

In 1997, Britain returned Hong Kong to China after some 150 years of colonial rule. In exchange, China agreed to a set of principles: Hong Kong would maintain its capitalist system for half a century, by which point its chief executive and members of the legislature would be elected by universal suffrage. As the thinking went, “one country, two systems” would suffice in the interim; Hong Kong and the Mainland would surely converge on democracy in the half-century to come.

Not so fast. Recently, Beijing has been systematically moving in the other direction. The decision on August 31 to rule out democratic elections for Hong Kong in 2017 was just the latest example. Chinese leader Xi Jinping’s transformational reform agenda is driving this shift—and it does not bode well for Hong Kong.

from Breakingviews:

China’s consumers show early signs of a debt wish

By John Foley

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

It’s a truism that Chinese people don’t like to borrow – but one that may no longer be true. China hasn’t gorged on consumer lending in the way that U.S. shoppers did, but rising credit card activity shows their traditional aversion to debt is fading fast.

from Breakingviews:

E-book: Alibaba and the twelve digits

By Breakingviews columnists

The authors are Breakingviews columnists. The opinions expressed are their own.

 

China’s e-commerce colossus is hitting the road for a $100-billion-plus IPO. But a spectacular growth story comes with quirks, including bizarre governance and founder Jack Ma’s penchant for offbeat deals. Breakingviews offers a punchy primer on the risks and rewards.

Read the e-book online (English)

Download the PDF (English)

Download the PDF (Chinese)

from Breakingviews:

Tianhe fraud claims hit at China free-rider effect

By John Foley

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist.  The opinions expressed are his own.

Fraud allegations and China are seemingly inseparable. Tianhe Chemicals, an industrial group that listed in Hong Kong less than three months ago, is under fire from a group alleging it cooked its books. This challenges not just the company’s integrity, but investors’ belief that when big names have pored over an initial public offering, they don’t have to.

from Breakingviews:

Six steps to Alibaba’s twelve-figure valuation

By Peter Thal Larsen 

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

How do you value a tech company? What about a dominant, fast-growing, profitable tech company with no peers that operates in an opaque economy? Fund managers need to decide as Alibaba kicks off the roadshow for its long-awaited initial public offering. Breakingviews offers a six-step guide to sizing up China’s biggest e-commerce group.

from Breakingviews:

Democracy snub leaves Hong Kong only bad choices

By Peter Thal Larsen

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Hong Kong’s narrowing options over future leadership elections could have broad repercussions. Voters in the former colony face only bad choices after Beijing proposed a tightly controlled system for choosing its chief executive. The decision escalates the risk of a showdown with protestors. It also suggests China’s leaders care ever less about the rest of the world’s opinion.

from Photographers' Blog:

Seven siblings in China

Jinhua, China

By William Hong

Even after I set out to visit his family, the story of Yang Hongnian and his seven children sounded unbelievable to me. As I stood in front of his makeshift house, which is just 20 meters square, I still wasn’t sure it could be true.

Yang Hongnian and Le Huimin's children drink outside their house in Jinhua, Zhejiang province, August 7, 2014. Migrant worker Yang, 47, his wife Le, and their seven children share a 20-square-metre makeshift  house on the outskirts of Jinhua, and live on around 3000-4000 yuan ($486.8-$649) which Yang earns from working at a construction site. Except for one daughter Le had with her ex-husband, the couple have given birth to six children in 10 years. REUTERS/William Hong (CHINA - Tags: SOCIETY) CHINA OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN CHINA

The children played around as I waited for Yang to finish work so that he could be interviewed. Eventually, he walked into the dimly lit space with a tired face and a lighted cigarette. The children rushed and surrounded him. Suddenly the already cramped house was completely full.

from Breakingviews:

Asia’s top-down corporate reforms vary in promise

By Una Galani

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

Asia is in the throes of a top-down corporate reform drive. Newish leaders in China, India, South Korea and Japan are pushing to overhaul the way companies work. Their efforts to increase corporate efficiency are welcome. But investors eyeing better returns will find not all reforms are equal.

from Breakingviews:

China Mobile’s foreign foray risks meagre returns

By Ethan Bilby

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

China Mobile is using its cash pile to hunt for growth overseas. If past industry experience is any guide, however, returns could be meagre. Many other mobile operators have failed to create value through cross border tie-ups.

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