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from Breakingviews:

China-U.S. cyber spat risks corporate casualties

By Ethan Bilby

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

China’s security spat with the United States risks corporate casualties on both sides. The People’s Republic has responded to U.S. allegations of cyber spying by targeting American tech companies. A continuing dispute could lead to blocked deals in the United States and lost sales in China. Though companies can try to ease concerns, it’s hard for them to escape a political escalation.

U.S. companies operating in China are already suffering a backlash. The government is scrutinising the use of IBM servers by state-owned banks, while state-run media has denounced American tech groups. Though Chinese buyers may resist government pressure to switch to local suppliers, the likes of IBM and Cisco have already reported falling revenue from the mainland.

Chinese companies eager to expand overseas also have little to gain. Lenovo’s planned acquisitions of IBM’s low-end server business and the Motorola handset business both require approval from the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS). The Chinese PC and smartphone maker must convince a panel of 16 U.S. agencies it doesn’t pose a security risk. The longer the process drags on, the bigger the risk that Lenovo gets dragged into the autumn U.S. mid-term election.

from Breakingviews:

Review: China gives Africa handy investment lesson

By Stephanie Rogan

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

In the last decade nearly a million Chinese citizens have taken up residence in Africa. In his vivid new book, “China’s Second Continent,” Howard French tells stories of these migrants and the Africans whose lives they affect. The book weaves anecdotes and interviews with historical and geopolitical background to tell a larger tale of the PRC’s economic engagement in the continent. The result is an unflattering portrait of China’s involvement.

from Breakingviews:

Jack Ma soccer buy does Alibaba investors a favour

By Peter Thal Larsen 

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Jack Ma’s decision to buy half of China’s most popular soccer club has done prospective investors in Alibaba a favour. The $192 million investment in Guangzhou Evergrande which the internet giant’s founder hatched over a drinking session this week won’t affect Alibaba’s value when it goes public later this year. But it offers a priceless insight into how the company works.

from Breakingviews:

Chinese hiccup temporarily deflates dairy bubble

By Ethan Bilby 

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

The world’s biggest milk importer is taking a break from its dairy diet. The price of milk-related products tracked by auction platform GlobalDairyTrade has fallen 25 percent since January. Though the decline is partly due to improving supply, demand from voracious buyer China has also fallen. That lull is unlikely to last.

from Photographers' Blog:

Living on e-waste

Dongxiaokou village, China

By Kim Kyung-Hoon

Dongxiaokou village lies just on the outskirts of Beijing, but a trip there does not really offer a pleasant escape from the city centre. For Dongxiaokou is no ordinary village: it is a hub for rubbish.

A waste recycle worker looks around a broken piano which he recently picked up from the street at the yard of his tenement house at Dongxiaokou village in Beijing May 14, 2014. This village is known as Beijing's biggest site for the disposal and recycling of electronic waste and it has been the home of E-waste collectors and recyclers for a decade.    REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon (CHINA)

For years, the area has been home to people who make their living by collecting and recycling electrical and electronic waste – from abandoned air-conditioners to fridges and TV sets. Several hundred families work to gather this “e-waste” from people in wealthy, downtown Beijing.

from Full Focus:

Ghosts of Tiananmen

Scenes from the bloody crackdown of pro-democracy protests in Tiananmen Square in 1989.

from Breakingviews:

China wrestles with repression of financial sort

By John Foley 

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

China is richer and more stable than when tanks rolled into Tiananmen Square 25 years ago. Then, incomplete political reforms led to chaos, violence and retrenchment. While there’s little risk of that now, a similar dynamic is playing out in the financial system.

from Breakingviews:

China’s strikes not as bad as they seem

By Katrina Hamlin

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

China’s workers are asking for more. Luckily, many employers can justify the expense.

from Breakingviews:

China index: Property helps slowdown drag on

By Katrina Hamlin

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

Our indicator stalled at 90.8 in April, just a touch up on March. The home front still looks sluggish. Rail cargo and truck sales fell while exports were flat. Property was a drag: average monthly sales growth from January to April was 17 pct, down from 22 pct last year.

from The Great Debate:

Let Japan help defend America — and itself

Members of Japan's Self-Defence Forces' airborne troops stand at attention during the annual SDF troop review ceremony at Asaka Base in Asaka

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is now following through on actions laid out in his recent bold speech calling for Japan to defend allies who might be under attack.

But wait, you may ask, hasn’t the United States had a mutual security treaty with Japan for more than half a century?

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