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from Breakingviews:

CITIC goes slowly on reform with $5.1 bln placing

By Una Galani 

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

CITIC Pacific is going slow on reform with its $5.1 billion placing. The Chinese group’s Hong Kong subsidiary will sell new shares to 15 investors as part of a union with its state-owned conglomerate parent. The placing allows CITIC Pacific to keep its stock market listing. Yet most of the money is coming from buyers also backed by the Chinese government. A deeper overhaul of state firms looks a way off.

CITIC Pacific’s mainland parent plans to swap assets worth $37 billion – ranging from finance to a football club – for shares in the Hong Kong-listed group. This would leave existing independent shareholders in CITIC Pacific with just 6.2 percent of the enlarged share capital – well below the minimum 15 percent required by Hong Kong rules. The placing lifts the free float to 18 percent.

Yet it’s questionable just how independent the new shareholders are. State-owned entities including China’s National Social Security Fund, the SAFE foreign exchange fund, and the country’s top commercial banks have directly and through subsidiaries agreed to buy more than 80 percent of the new shares. Strip out Chinese government cash and the enlarged group’s free float shrinks to less than 9 percent.

from Breakingviews:

Macau casino stocks have further to fall

By Ethan Bilby 

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Macau casino stocks are still too high. A crackdown on Chinese payment card UnionPay is the latest threat to the gambling bonanza in the former Portuguese colony. Though casino stocks have fallen by almost a fifth in a few months, there’s not much room for disappointment.

from Breakingviews:

China’s other e-commerce giant is priced to go

By John Foley
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Being second has its advantages. JD.com, China’s number two e-commerce company, has set an indicative range for its initial public offering that values it at around $23 billion. That’s far behind the $100 billion-plus price tag attached to rival Alibaba. But it leaves room for a decent performance.

from Ian Bremmer:

Japan’s path forward, in five steps

japan888

On the surface, Barack Obama’s recent Japan visit struck all the right chords for Tokyo. For the first time ever, an American president stated that the U.S.-Japan security treaty extends to the Senkaku/Diaoyu islands dispute, the most combustible geopolitical conflict between Japan and China. And Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe announced a “key milestone” for negotiations on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), the trade deal that encompasses 12 countries and more than 40 percent of the world’s economic output.

But there was less to the visit than meets the eye. Obama’s Senkaku pledge was a restatement of existing U.S. policy. The “key milestone” on TPP was never identified; in fact, it seems that the 40 hours of bilateral discussions between the U.S. and Japan led to no breakthrough at all. And while the trip was a big win for Obama -- he managed to placate Tokyo without provoking Beijing -- it didn’t offer any solutions for how Japan should deal with a rising China.

from Breakingviews:

Alibaba finance arm better out than in for IPO

By John Foley

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Alibaba’s secret weapon is its payment division. Yet Alipay isn’t part of the Chinese e-commerce company’s upcoming initial public offering. The company is “conceptually” thinking about reuniting them, according to people familiar with the situation. But the status quo, however strange, looks better.

from Breakingviews:

Pfizer unlikely to avoid China anti-trust therapy

By Ethan Bilby

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

The chance to vet Pfizer’s $106 billion offer for rival drug-maker AstraZeneca looks too good to pass up for China’s competition watchdog. Pfizer should brace for some antitrust therapy, though getting Astra’s board on-side first may help.

from Breakingviews:

Alibaba’s big reveal: high growth, odd governance

By John Foley 

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

There are two things to know about Alibaba, which filed for an initial public offering in New York on May 6. First, China’s dominant e-commerce company is huge, and could be even bigger. Second, new investors will have little say in how it is run – the founders are keeping a firm grip.

from Breakingviews:

Muzzling China’s money market mania

By John Foley 

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

China’s craze for online money market funds is giving savers a taste of financial democracy. That’s a good thing, if China avoids the mistakes that have given these products a bad name elsewhere.

from Breakingviews:

WH Group flop shows pitfalls of crowded IPOs

By Una Galani

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

WH Group’s flop shows the pitfalls of overcrowded initial public offerings. The Chinese pork producer hired a record 29 banks but still failed to sell its $1.3 billion listing to investors. That undermines the standard wisdom that more advisers mean less risk for issuers. For banks, it’s a reminder that they can share embarrassment as well as sought-after league table credit.

from Breakingviews:

WH Group’s pulled pork IPO is least bad outcome

By Una Galani
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

This little piggy isn’t going to the market after all. WH Group has scrapped its Hong Kong listing after investors turned their noses up at its valuation. The Chinese pork producer had already more than halved the size of the fundraising to as little as $1.3 billion. A delay which gives the company formerly known as Shuanghui more time to integrate its U.S. subsidiary Smithfield is probably the least bad outcome.

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