from The Great Debate:

These five ideas will either fix global warming or break the planet

By Julia Calderone
April 22, 2015

Small forest fires are pictured between pine trees at night at Sierra de Tejeda nature park, on a burnt mountain from El Collado mountain pass, near the town of Competa

Small forest fires are pictured between pine trees at night at Sierra de Tejeda nature park in southern Spain early June 30, 2014. REUTERS/Jon Nazca

from The Great Debate:

Cause behind African migrant flood has terrifying implications for the world

By Michael Werz and Max Hoffman
April 21, 2015

Italian coastguard and Armed Forces of Malta personnel in protective clothing carry the body of a dead immigrant off the ship Bruno Gregoretti in Senglea

Italian coastguard and Armed Forces of Malta personnel in protective clothing carry the body of a dead immigrant off the ship Bruno Gregoretti in Senglea, in Valletta's Grand Harbour, April 20, 2015. REUTERS/Darrin Zammit Lupi

from Stories I’d like to see:

Bottom line on climate change: It’s costing you money

By Steven Brill
November 18, 2014

Participants wearing masks during a hazy day at the Beijing International Marathon in front of Tiananmen Square, in Beijing

This column by Martin Wolf in the Financial Times last week is a story I’m glad I saw. It prompted me to think about how to make reporting on a subject I usually find boring a lot more compelling.

from Unstructured Finance:

Alexander Soros says environmental activists should be considered ‘great heroes’

By Jennifer Ablan
November 17, 2014

ALEXSOROSAlexander Soros, the son of legendary investor George Soros, said the death of a Peruvian environmental activist fighting to save the Amazon rainforest moved him to act.

from The Great Debate UK:

Starting with the Arctic, could some effects of global warming be reversed?

By Guest Contributor
October 24, 2014

By Julian Hunt, Visiting Professor at Delft University of Technology, a member of the UK House of Lords, and former Director General of the UK Meteorological Office. The opinions expressed are his own.

from The Great Debate:

Humans don’t do ‘future’ well, and that could doom us if we’re not careful

By Richard Schiffman
September 23, 2014

A protester carries a sign during the "People's Climate March" in the Manhattan borough of New York

There has been some rare good news about the environment recently. One was hard to miss. On Sunday, roughly 300,000 people swelled the streets of midtown Manhattan in the People’s Climate March. It was not just the largest climate protest in history; it was the biggest U.S. political demonstration of any kind in more than a decade.

from The Human Impact:

Deadly Indian landslide may have been a man-made disaster

August 4, 2014

A resident looks at the debris of her damaged house after a landslide at Malin village in Maharashtra

landslide in western India that has killed more than 100 people and left scores missing may have been a man-made disaster caused by deforestation to make way for farming, experts say.

from The Great Debate:

Keeping a city-by-the-sea from becoming a city in it

By James Sanders and Jesse M. Keenan
July 21, 2014

skyline1908

Virtually every big rainstorm in New York now seems to be accompanied by a flash-flood alert sent to cellphones. And scientists recently reported that a vast section of Antarctica’s ice sheet, now melting, might bring on as much as a 10-foot rise in the world’s sea levels in the coming decades.

from Reihan Salam:

Technology, not regulation, is the best way to tackle climate change

By Reihan Salam
June 6, 2014

 warming111

By all accounts, President Obama is deeply interested in his legacy. And though relatively few American voters see dealing with climate change as a top priority for the federal government, the president famously sees it as the most important issue he can address in his second term. Having failed to shepherd climate change legislation through Congress in 2009, when Democrats had large majorities in the Senate and the House, the Obama administration has shifted to using new regulations to achieve its environmental policy goals. This week, the Environmental Protection Agency introduced its Clean Power Plant Proposed Rule, a sweeping initiative that aims to reduce carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants.

from Counterparties:

Green(ish) energy

June 3, 2014

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This week, the EPA unveiled its new rule to cut carbon emissions by 30% by 2030 (that is, 30% from 2005 levels). Most of those cuts will come from burning less coal, which is currently the source of about 38% of the United States’ electricity.