from Photographers' Blog:

Boom and bust in Parachute

December 12, 2014

Parachute, Colorado
By Jim Urquhart

"I don't know how you can weather this if you can't roll."

Much of the history of the American West is based on stories of booms and the almost inevitable bust that follows. The land is dotted with decaying remnants of towns that once seemed to be drenched in fortune but then strangled by the drought of bust.

from The Great Debate:

How strong Senate candidates can help GOP also flip statehouses

By Grover G. Norquist and Patrick Gleason
September 22, 2014

Scott Brown, a Republican candidate for the U.S. Senate, speaks during a town hall campaign stop at a VFW post in Hudson

Midterm election models continue to project that Republicans will gain control of the U.S. Senate, as the Washington Post’s Chris Cillizza recently reported. The GOP is running strong candidates, many in red states that Mitt Romney won 2012, but also stronger than first expected in states that went for President Barack Obama that year -- including Colorado, New Hampshire and Oregon, which weren’t previously considered in play.

from Photographers' Blog:

Living through a disaster

September 30, 2013

Golden, Colorado

By Rick Wilking

In a career as long as mine, spread across several continents, I have covered many, many natural disasters. If you have read my blog posts lately that seems to be all I write about. But this time is different. This time, I am a victim of a disaster.

from Photographers' Blog:

Hiking in to a stranded town

September 18, 2013

Jamestown, Colorado

By Rick Wilking

My rule in covering natural disasters has always been: Find the worst damage first. That’s what the reporters will be writing about and it's what people want to see. It also may be the hardest to get to.

from Photographers' Blog:

Revisiting the Waldo Canyon fire

August 21, 2013

Colorado Springs, Colorado

By Rick Wilking

Covering natural disasters is a strange thing. You get there all in a huff, as fast as you can after the tragedy, and then try to seek out the major damage. You document all that, often busting hump for very long days, for a week or more depending on how bad it is.

from Reihan Salam:

The sober way to legalize marijuana

By Reihan Salam
August 16, 2013

As a general rule, Americans don’t give much thought to Uruguay, a small South American republic with a population of 3.3 million. But Uruguay has embarked on a new experiment with marijuana legalization that merits close attention. As Ken Parks of the Wall Street Journal reported late last month, new Uruguayan legislation will allow individuals to grow as much as 480 grams of marijuana for personal consumption, and marijuana cooperatives with no more than 45 members will be permitted to grow just over two plants per member. The government will also allow for limited commercial production, but Uruguayan lawmakers have made it clear that they don’t want a domestic marijuana market dominated by large for-profit firms.

from Full Focus:

Images of July

August 1, 2012

A community was left reeling after a gunman went on a shooting rampage at a midnight showing of "The Dark Knight Rises" in Aurora, Colorado. Mitt Romney and President Obama traded barbs as the election campaign heated up and the world watched as London kicked off the summer Olympic Games.

from Photographers' Blog:

Facing tragedy in Colorado

July 25, 2012

By Shannon Stapleton

I woke on the morning of July 20th happy and looking forward to a great weekend with my son at his last lacrosse tournament of the season.

from Alison Frankel:

Why violence, but not sex, is protected by the First Amendment

By Alison Frankel
July 23, 2012

In the mid-1950s, a small-time New York publisher named Samuel Roth was indicted for distributing books, magazines, photos and advertising circulars that were accused of being "obscene, lewd, lascivious, filthy and of an indecent character." The precise content of Roth's offensive mailings has been lost to history, although it's probably tame by modern standards. Nevertheless, a federal jury in New York concluded that the publisher violated a law barring distribution of pornography, and the court sentenced Roth to five years in prison. The case eventually made its way to the U.S. Supreme Court. In 1957, the justices upheld Roth's conviction, in a landmark ruling that obscenity is not entitled to First Amendment protection. The court said that the law had always assumed sexual material is not covered by the Constitution's free speech provision, so its ruling merely codified that assumption. The Roth decision placed obscenity in the tiny category of exceptions to First Amendment freedom, along with incitement and fighting words.

from The Great Debate:

Terror born from rage

By Michael Maiello
July 20, 2012

Thus far, nothing of reliable note has been revealed about the motives of James Holmes, the arrested suspect behind the Dark Night Massacre, where a dozen people were murdered and others injured at an after-midnight premiere of the latest Batman movie. What we do know suggests intricate planning, and the planning suggests a rationale, irrational though it may be.