Archive

Reuters blog archive

from Breakingviews:

Why Time Warner shareholders should listen to Murdoch’s muzzled minorities

By Rob Cox

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Time Warner shareholders pondering whether to surrender to Rupert Murdoch would be well advised to listen to the media mogul’s muzzled minorities. Most Twenty-First Century Fox believers are relegated to owning non-voting stock in the entertainment conglomerate, the same second-tier paper on offer as part of the $80 billion takeover bid for the owner of HBO, CNN and Warner Bros. studios. Despite broad investor overlap in the two companies, the record shows a clear distaste for Murdoch’s imperialism.

It takes a little simple division to work out the fair-and-balanced view from Fox shareholders not named Murdoch. That’s because the bulk of the company’s equity capital – 65 percent to be precise – comprises Class A securities, which prevents their owners from voting on most matters of interest, like choosing the board of directors or vetting executive compensation. There are about 1.5 billion of these shares outstanding.

Fox’s less liquid Class B shares carry all the voting clout. There are about 800 million of these, with Murdoch entities controlling approximately 315 million of them. That translates into an economic interest of about 13.6 percent in the company, but an outsized 39.4 percent of the vote. Fold in another 56.2 million shares held by Murdoch pal Saudi Prince Alwaleed bin Talal, and his consolidated voting stake rises to 46.4 percent.

from Breakingviews:

Murdoch may be heading for Pyrrhic Time Warner win

By Robert Cyran

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Rupert Murdoch may yet buy Time Warner, but it may be a Pyrrhic victory. The owner of HBO quickly shut off Twenty-First Century Fox’s $80 billion or so offer. Yet Murdoch appears determined to buy his media rival. Problem is, he’d need more than twice the synergies Fox has already identified to make the deal work – and a ton of debt. History suggests the octogenarian won’t give up – and may destroy value by offering more.

from Breakingviews:

Gowex collapse leaves egg on many faces

By Fiona Maharg-Bravo

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

The collapse of Gowex has ramifications beyond Spain’s junior stock market for riskier companies. The Spanish wifi provider has said its chief executive admitted falsifying the accounts, days after investment firm Gotham City Research attacked the company. With Gowex held up as the poster child for Spanish entrepreneurialism, its impending failure will make life harder for other small firms.

from Breakingviews:

Solving the second-class stock conundrum

By Rob Cox

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. 

Over dinner in San Francisco recently, an activist investor and an internet entrepreneur got into a heated discussion. The two men, with a gap of about two decades between them, were debating the practice of many young, growth businesses in the technology world – though it happens elsewhere too – to issue multiple classes of stock, generally one for hoi polloi investors in public offerings and another for founders and other insiders with super-charged voting powers.

from Breakingviews:

BNP’s Prot should go

By Pierre Briançon

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Baudouin Prot should go. The French establishment has circled the wagons, and there is little chance that the chairman of BNP Paribas, who was the bank’s chief executive at the time of the criminal activities it just admitted to, will resign or be asked to. He will then fail to do the decent thing after the bank’s unprecedented guilty plea and near-$9 billion fine.

from Breakingviews:

BNP’s chief operating officer retires. Next?

By Pierre Briançon

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.  

The only thing missing in the BNP Paribas release announcing the retirement of Chief Operating Officer Georges Chodron de Courcel is that he wanted a new challenge. Otherwise, it is business as usual at France’s largest bank: the long-serving No. 2 was planning to retire in September. He suddenly noticed that a new French law was putting a limit on the number of directorships he could hold, so in fact he will leave at the end of this month. U.S. probe, anyone? Sanctions violations? Multibillion-dollar fine?

from Edward Hadas:

A corporate abdication of corruption

By Edward Hadas

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Allegations of corruption did not exactly cost King Juan Carlos the Spanish throne, but they probably played a role in his decision to abdicate. A popular desire for change was fuelled in part by claims of a 5.6 million euro fraud by his son-in-law, Inaki Urdangarin, who denies any wrongdoing. The resulting dynastic change may be considered a sign that corruption has become less acceptable. That would be a misreading.

from Breakingviews:

Clippers may actually be Ballmer’s least-bad deal

By Jeffrey Goldfarb
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

The Los Angeles Clippers may actually be Steve Ballmer’s least-bad deal. That’s not saying much given the former Microsoft chief executive’s acquisition track record. But television revenue means sports teams are no longer money pits. Even including the ego premium in the $2 billion price tag, buying the NBA franchise could work out better than aQuantive, Skype or Nokia.

from Financial Regulatory Forum:

U.S. compliance salary report: More jobs, higher pay, but post-crisis boost is limited

By Emmanuel Olaoye and Stuart Gittleman, Compliance Complete

NEW YORK, May 29, 2014 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - The job market for compliance professionals is picking up. But the high fines and complicated investigations financial services firms face as regulators and enforcers sharpen their scrutiny after the 2008 financial crisis have had a limited impact on compensation trends, boutique recruiters and global firms told Compliance Complete.

Average starting salaries in a broad range of financial compliance positions rose 2.3 percent to 4.2 percent in 2013, according to figures from Robert Half, an international recruitment firm. (See chart) That compares with about 3.4 percent among financial professionals as a group.

from Breakingviews:

Failed bid would leave Astra under pressure

By Chris Hughes
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

The likely failure of U.S. drugmaker Pfizer’s $119 billion bid for AstraZeneca, which was due to lapse on May 26, would leave the frustrated buyer no worse off. But the target has much to prove. Some of its shareholders welcomed a possible takeover - and could again.

  •