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from India Insight:

Tendulkar exits, Anand slips during emotional 2013

Sachin Tendulkar bid a teary-eyed farewell to cricket while contemporary Viswanathan Anand lost his world chess crown in an emotional year for Indians in sports.

Forty-year-old Tendulkar, statistically the greatest batsman ever, walked into the sunset in November after his 200th test at his home Wankhede Stadium brought the cricket-crazy nation to a standstill.

"My life's been 22 yards for 24 years. It's hard to believe that wonderful journey is coming to an end," an emotional Tendulkar said during a moving farewell speech as most Indians on and off the ground battled to hold back tears.

His phenomenal success on the cricket field and impeccable lifestyle off it made him a perfect role model for India's burgeoning youth population.

from India Insight:

Sachin Tendulkar: What his peers said over the years

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By Sankalp Phartiyal and Aditya Kalra

Sachin Tendulkar's 200th test match, against West Indies at the Wankhede Stadium, will also be his last as the 'Little Master' brings the curtain down on a glittering 24-year cricket career at the age of 40. (Click here for main story)

Here’s a look at how Tendulkar’s peers on the cricketing field have described him over the years:

from India Insight:

Documentary captures Indian cricket’s lesser-known faces

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Prithvi Shaw is 14 and looks like any other schoolboy at first glance. But those who have seen him wield a cricket bat call him India's next Sachin Tendulkar. They say he's as natural and as powerful in his stroke play as the world's most famous batsman was at that age. Shaw started playing when he was three, going up against people more than twice his age.

"He was shorter than the stumps he used to bat in front of," Shaw's father said.

from Photographers' Blog:

Little gladiators: China’s cricket fighting

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Beijing, China

By Kim Kyung-hoon

On a late summer day in Beijing while roaming through the narrow alleyways of an old pet market I heard the chirping of insects. It was such a refreshing sound on a stiflingly hot day. At one point, the chirping grew louder and louder, and my curiosity led me into one alley. There, I found countless little insects in bird cages and small jars on sale and waiting for their new owners.

According to a cricket expert, keeping crickets as singing pets is an old Chinese tradition which dates back more than 3,200 years. Unlike in some countries, where people treat crickets with disdain and repel them with bug spray, in China the chirping of crickets traditionally has been regarded as beautiful music. Even more interesting than the singing crickets in small cages was the men observing hundreds of small jars with very serious faces.

from India Insight:

Piecing together the ‘Great Tamasha’ of Indian cricket

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The Great Tamasha” is a book about cricket, but it is also a tale about the rapid rise of modern India and the corruption that plagues it. A series of scandals in the Indian Premier League (IPL), the glitzy Twenty20 tournament run by the country’s cricket board, got James Astill hooked to the game in India. What followed was the 40-year-old journalist’s first book - an account of India’s rich cricketing tradition, politics, religion and the emergence of the cash-rich IPL.

Astill takes the reader from the slums of Mumbai to a village in north India, places where cricket is as much tamasha (spectacle) as it is religion. Bollywood stars, business tycoons and cricketers, both past and present, feature in “The Great Tamasha”. So does Lalit Modi, a former IPL chairman, now an outcast in India’s cricketing circles.

from India Insight:

Elsewhere in India: Maria Sharapova wins hearts, minds of cameramen

Here's some more news that we found in the Indian press over the weekend and would like to share with you. Rather than present stories of great national importance, we would like to highlight some of the items that you are less likely to see in world news reports. Any opinions that the author might express are surely beneath contempt, and are not necessarily those of Thomson Reuters.

Tennis pro Maria Sharapova visited India. Gushing ensued. "The 25-year-old, here to announce her partnership with UK-based real estate company Homestead, sported an infectious smile throughout the interaction even though the lensmen could not get to focus enough of capturing the blonde beauty. 'Well, it is just the hair and make-up you know. I don't wake up looking like this,' quipped Sharapova when a scribe called her pretty. Here only for a day, Sharapova said food and culture was something she would take back from India. 'I arrived last night and asked the chef what should I try of the Indian food. I had a dosa which tasted really nice. I wanted to have this great Indian experience. There is so much energy in the city, I have been in some quiet areas recently, resting. I really like the culture and people. You all have been really welcoming.'" Final score: love-love. (NDTV)

from India Insight:

Time to look beyond Rohit Sharma

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Indian cricket has always been blamed for persisting with players on account of reputation -- and in some cases experience. But the way Rohit Sharma, who currently lacks both, was handed game after game on the recently concluded tour of Sri Lanka shows a new trend emerging -- one that of selecting players on the basis of "unrealised potential".

Rohit may have it in him to succeed at the highest level but the Indian team management must decide how many is too many, for now at least, especially with Manoj Tiwary and Ajinkya Rahane waiting in the wings.

from India Insight:

Mark of Boucher

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In cricket, and in life, a perfect end is a rarity.

Even Don Bradman was bereft of it. Yet a not-so-perfect ending cannot deny a few sportsmen their legitimate place in the sun. South Africa's wicket-keeper Mark Boucher is one such cricketer.

His remarkably long international career, of almost 15 years, was tragically snuffed out when he was hit in the eye by a bail in a warm-up match against Somerset on July 9 during the ongoing England tour. He was only one short of 1,000 victims -- an unheard of feat in the 145 years of international cricket history.

from India Insight:

Sachin Tendulkar: from Wankhede to parliament

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So it's just a matter of time, according to media reports, before Sachin Tendulkar swaps his India jersey for starched white and walks into the Rajya Sabha.

While the clamour was growing to honour him with the Bharat Ratna, the country's highest civilian award, few expected him to be nominated to the upper house.

from India Insight:

In Dada, Yuvraj finds a way to use his unutilised hair gel

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Yuvraj Singh has finally found a way to make sure the hair gel lying unused in his cupboard is not completely wasted.

The Punjab cricketer, known for experimenting with hairdos, has gone completely bald following chemotherapy sessions in his battle against cancer.

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