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from India Insight:

New book describes crimes against civilians during Mizo uprising

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The two-decade-long Mizo rebellion from 1966 to 1986 remains the only conflict in which the Indian government used war planes against its citizens. Few written records exist on the conflict in which the Mizo National Front (MNF) revolted against the government, trying to establish an independent country.

A new book by a former militant in the Mizo National Army (MNA), the armed wing of the MNF, recounts the air bombings and the government’s “grouping” policy, under which villages in what is now Mizoram state were burned and civilians relocated to guarded centres called Protected and Progressive Villages.

“Untold Atrocity” by C. Zama deals with incidents in which civilians suffered or were allegedly killed by security forces. The book also assumes significance today because the Armed Forces Special Powers Act (AFSPA), which allowed security forces an almost free hand in arresting or shooting anyone during the insurgency, is still enforced in Jammu and Kashmir and some areas of India’s northeast.

Zama in this interview talks about the almost unlimited powers the army wielded during the insurgency, and why the Mizoram Accord, which is touted as the most successful peace treaty in India, has not been fully implemented.

from Photographers' Blog:

Courage in the face of brutality

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San Salvador, El Salvador

By Ulises Rodriguez

The clock on the wall marked four in the morning. It was a cold and wet Saturday in July, but I was sitting in the warm offices of El Salvador’s Red Cross. Suddenly, the relative calm and silence in the emergency unit was interrupted when the phone rang. The loud noise made me jump. The phone operator said: “What is your name? If you don’t identify yourself, we can’t help you.”

I went to the operator and asked him what was happening. He said that there had been a report of a woman who had been beaten, raped several times and then left for dead in a ditch. He said that they would take her to hospital because of the severity of her injuries and I asked to go along.

from Photographers' Blog:

Opening a blind eye to femicide

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Guatemala City, Guatemala

By Jorge Dan Lopez

Violence and death are always present and tangible in Guatemala. The population seems to accept it as normal, even more so when women are the victims. In many cases, society simply ignores it, sits in silence or turns a blind eye.

Many men treat women as if they have no rights, thinking it unusual that someone should be punished or fined for beating, raping or killing them.

from India Insight:

Mumbai police look to Bollywood for image makeover

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Mumbai's police department has deployed an unusual strategy to revamp its sagging reputation and to counter criticism that it hasn't done a good job at solving crimes against women in the city - it called the biggest game in town and asked for help.

Top city police officers, including the police commissioner, have asked Bollywood producers, directors and writers to portray them in a more positive light than they usually do.

from Photographers' Blog:

The crime of dog kidnapping

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Mexico City, Mexico

By Edgard Garrido

A woman approached me while I was taking pictures of a leaflet with information on a purebred dog that had gone missing in Parque Mexico. She was on a bike and she had a dog with her whose head easily reached my belly. She asked me if I was doing a story and she introduced herself as Mariam Luzcan “a protector of dogs and a true dog lover”. She was dressed in black and covered with what I suppose was dog hair and lots of dirt, she smelled like dog too. But I liked her so we agreed to meet again in a couple of days and do a story together on missing dogs.

In Mexico City, dog kidnapping has become another way of making an illegal, but quick, buck. It is becoming more common as many of the capital dwellers own lots of dogs. And I mean lots - not one or two, but four or even six or seven pooches at a time. Of course there is a wide range of businesses dedicated to the well-being of man’s best friend. There are dog hairdressers, dog clothing lines, specialty food stores, dog hotels, companies that arrange adoptions for “orphaned” dogs, security for dogs, massages for dogs, crematoriums for dogs, you name it.

from India Insight:

Photographer gang-raped in Mumbai

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A 22-year-old photographer was gang-raped by five men in India's financial capital Mumbai on Thursday, evoking comparisons with a similar incident in Delhi in December that led to nationwide protests.

The incident took place near the posh Lower Parel area when the woman, a photojournalist with a magazine, was out on assignment. She was accompanied by a male colleague, media reports said.

from Photographers' Blog:

Last days in a Siberian prison

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Outside Krasnoyarsk, Russia

By Ilya Naymushin

Boris Kovalyov is not my hero – not at all. I have never understood such people, the way they think, the way they live. But journalists work with all kinds of people, and to me, people in extreme circumstances have always been of particular interest. And so Kovalyov, a non-hero, became the hero of my photo story, which might be called “The Last Ten Days in a Siberian Prison Camp.”

Boris is 32 years old. He was first jailed for theft, and was sent to a prison camp near Krasnoyarsk. After a few years he was granted early release, with the understanding that he had learned his lesson. Under Russian law, a relapse into crime means the convict serves the time he was spared by early release, and is often sent to a higher-security prison.

from Full Focus:

Inside Siberia’s prisons

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Photographer Ilya Naymushin spent time documenting life inside Siberian prisons, including high-security male prison camp number 17, a facility outside Russia's Siberian city of Krasnoyarsk for male inmates who are serving a sentence for the first time and have been convicted for serious crimes. The prisoners work in wood and metal processing shops, manufacture furniture, sew clothes and do other kinds of work. Naymushin also documented the end of 32-year-old Boris Kovalyov's time in high-security male prison camp number 5, for men who have multiple convictions for serious crimes. Kovalyov was sentenced to eight years in a high-security prison camp for drug trafficking, but was released two and a half years early for good behaviour and participation in sports and cultural activities. Read Ilya's personal account here.

from Entrepreneurial:

Q&A with cyber crime expert Tim Francis

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Timothy C. Francis is Second Vice President for Travelers Bond & Financial Products in Hartford, CT. Francis leads Travelers’ Business Insurance Management and Professional Liability initiatives and serves as Enterprise lead for Cyber Insurance. Reuters spoke with him about what small businesses need to know about cyber crime. 


Small business owners hear a lot about the dangers of cyber crime and how they should fear it, but what exactly should they be afraid of? What are some examples of how small businesses can be affected by cyber crime?

from Full Focus:

Shot in the murder capital

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WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT

Photographer Jorge Cabrera spent time on patrol with local police in San Pedro Sula, which was named the world's most violent city for a second year in a row, as they arrived at the crime scenes of victims of gun violence. Jorge documented the city's busy emergency room and visited the morgue. San Pedro Sula, the country's second largest city after Tegucigalpa, has a homicide rate of 169 per 100,000 people. Lax laws allow civilians to own up to five personal guns, and arms trafficking has flooded the country with nearly 70% illegal firearms. Read Jorge's personal account here.

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