from MacroScope:

G20 treads familiar ground

By Mike Peacock
February 10, 2015

OECD Secretary General Gurria casts his shadow on the podium as he speaks during a news conference in the G20 finance ministers and central bank governors meeting in Istanbul

G20 finance ministers and central bankers meeting in Istanbul will pledge to act decisively on monetary and fiscal policy if needed to combat the risk of  stagnation, according to a draft communique obtained by Reuters last night. As has been customary at these summits, a lot of the discussion implicitly centres on Germany.

from MacroScope:

Tsipras not for turning

By Mike Peacock
February 9, 2015

Greek Prime Minister Tsipras delivers his first major speech in parliament in Athens

Alexis Tsipras is not for turning, not yet anyway.

Speaking in parliament on Sunday night the new Greek premier said he would not accept an extension to Greece's current bailout, something the euro zone is urging him to do, and stuck with austerity-ending pledges such as giving free food and electricity to those who need it, reinstating civil servants who had been fired as part of bailout conditions and raising the minimum wage. Privatisations have already been halted.

from Morning Bid with David Gaffen:

The once in a 100,000-years event

January 16, 2015

The surprise move Thursday from the Swiss National Bank has had the effect of confusing a lot of people about a lot of things: the SNB’s intentions, the timing, the ancillary effects and who the losers are.

from Breakingviews:

Bitcoin is latest victim of disinflation

By Edward Hadas
January 16, 2015

By Edward Hadas

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Breakingviews:

Swiss recalibrate currency world by dropping peg

By Edward Hadas
January 15, 2015

By Edward Hadas

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. 

from MacroScope:

Major central banks set to go their own way, with some risk

January 9, 2015

Real interest rates of world's major central banks

Real interest rates of world's major central banks

The world's major central banks have long followed the same general flight path, guided by the economic winds of growth, inflation and financial markets. It has worked pretty well for policymakers in the United States, Europe, Japan, and the United Kingdom: moving together to tighten or loosen monetary policy makes things more predictable for citizens, businesses and investors. It also serves as buffer to any volatile currency movements, at least among developed economies. But six years after the worst recession in decades, this could be the year central bankers split off and - with some risk - go their own way.

from Breakingviews:

Only Putin can stop rouble’s fall

November 7, 2014

By Pierre Briançon

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Global Investing:

Strong dollar, weak oil and emerging markets growth

October 17, 2014

Many emerging economies have been banking on weaker currencies to revitalise economic growth.  Oil's 25 percent fall in dollar terms this year should also help. The problem however is the dollar's strength which is leading to a general tightening of monetary conditions worldwide, more so in countries where central banks are intervening to prevent their currencies from falling too much.

from Breakingviews:

Russian central bank intervention is a dead end

October 8, 2014

By Pierre Briançon

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Over-Gaffenated:

Brazil on the grill

September 24, 2014

The idea of increased political risk when it comes to the U.S. markets has been mined before, and it’s true that the uncertainty that surrounds debates such as the renewal of the Export-Import Bank’s charter and the growing expectation that Republicans, should they take power in November in the Senate, could force another confrontation over the debt ceiling. That said, political risk in the U.S. isn’t anything when compared with Brazil as the largest South American economy gears up for its presidential election, a contest between current president Dilma Rousseff and environmentalist Marina Silva, who until last month wasn’t even running (she was the vice presidential candidate for her party, whose original candidate was killed in a plane crash).