from Tales from the Trail:

One Washington day is not like another for Mr. Hu

January 19, 2011

USA-CHINA/China's President Hu Jintao was feted with full fanfare at the White House on Wednesday, with a 21-gun salute, honor guards and a state dinner. Things might not be quite so fancy on Thursday when he goes to Capitol Hill.

from Tales from the Trail:

Washington Extra – Ducking the issue

October 16, 2010

U.S. Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner testifies before a Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee hearing on The Treasury Department's Report on International Economic and Exchange Rate Policies on Capitol Hill in Washington September 16, 2010.

We were all primed for the release of the Treasury’s global currency report this afternoon, which would have included a ruling on whether China was a currency manipulator. But a decision was taken to delay the report until after the Group of 20 summit in Seoul in mid-November.

from Tales from the Trail:

Washington Extra – Goldilocks Geithner

September 16, 2010

Not too hot, not too cold, just right.geithner18

U.S. Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner performed a delicate balancing act on the Hill today. On the one hand, Geithner had to tell an increasingly angry Congress that he was serious about trying to persuade China to revalue its currency, the yuan. On the other, he wanted to head off the kind of unilateral action from Congress that could provoke a trade war, and endanger the administration’s efforts to engage Beijing on a whole slew of issues.

from Tales from the Trail:

Geithner tells Congress: calling China names doesn’t get you anywhere

September 16, 2010

U.S. lawmakers are mad and want Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner to step in and call China a name -- "currency manipulator" -- which may not sound like much on city streets but can be quite an insult in world financial circles.

from Breakingviews:

China’s yuan rebuttal puts U.S. in a bind

March 15, 2010

Name-calling doesn't hurt -- unless the tag happens to be "currency manipulator". U.S. Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner has a month to decide whether to lay that epithet on China in his half-yearly report. Premier Wen Jiabao's muscular denial this weekend that the yuan is undervalued makes that more likely. But retaliation would be costly for the United States.