from Global Investing:

No more currency war. Mantega dumps the IOF

June 5, 2013

Brazil's finance minister Guido Mantega, one of the most shrill critics of Western money-printing, has decided to repeal the so-called IOF tax, he imposed almost three years ago as a measure to fend off  hot money flows.

from MacroScope:

Currency chatter

By Mike Peacock
February 11, 2013

With the rhetoric getting more heated, the three-year market fixation on bond yields could well be supplanted by currencies in the months ahead.

from MacroScope:

Market/economy disconnect?

By Mike Peacock
January 30, 2013

Italy comes to the market with a five- and 10-year bond auction today and, continuing the early year theme, yields are expected to fall with demand healthy. It could raise up to 6.5 billion euros. A sale of six-month paper on Tuesday was snapped up at a yield of just 0.73 percent. Not only is the bond market unfazed by next month’s Italian elections, which could yet produce a chaotic aftermath, neither is it bothered by the scandal enveloping the world’s oldest bank, Monte dei Paschi, which is deepening by the day.

from Nicholas Wapshott:

The looming currency war

By Nicholas Wapshott
January 23, 2013

Are we about to be sucked into a currency war? As the world economy continues to splutter, countries are looking for ways to break out of the mire. One way of gaining popularity is to promote growth through making exports cheap. The key to an export-led recovery is to devalue a national currency, thereby lowering the prices of exports. By allowing its currency price to slide, a nation can launch a surreptitious trade war against its commercial rivals. Western nations have for years accused China of taking an unfair trade advantage by keeping its currency, and therefore export prices, artificially low. By allowing their currencies to devalue, Western countries are fighting back.

from Global Investing:

Korean exporters’ yen nightmare (corrected)

January 17, 2013

(corrects name of hedge fund in para 3 to Symphony Financial Partners)

Any doubt about the importance of a weaker yen in thawing the frozen Japanese economy will have been dispelled by the Nikkei's surge to 32-month highs this week. Since early December, when it became clear an incoming Shinzo Abe administration would do its best to weaken the yen, the equity index has surged as the yen has fallen.

from Global Investing:

This week in EM, expect more doves

September 24, 2012

With the U.S. Fed having cranked up its printing presses, there seems little to stop emerging central banks from extending their own rate cut campaigns this week.

from Financial Regulatory Forum:

Thailand heads in wrong direction with bond tax -IFR

By Reuters Staff
October 18, 2010

(This article was in IFR Asia magazine, a Thomson Reuters publication, on Oct 16)

from Financial Regulatory Forum:

ANALYSIS-Indonesia inflows surge raising risk of controls

By Reuters Staff
October 5, 2010

By Neil Chatterjee and Aditya Suharmoko

JAKARTA, Oct 5 (Reuters) - It's taken a year, but Indonesia's central bank has finally won over markets into accepting its dovish policy outlook. Still, it doesn't feel like a success.

from MacroScope:

Investment Week: From the Trenches…

September 30, 2010

Early September skirmishes turned this week into full-scale “currency wars”, to use Brazil’s terminology. Dramatic language, but not unwarranted. The markets have taken Fed signals of preparation for further money printing as an effective attempt at a dollar devaluation, allowing the country export its deflationary pressures overseas via capital outflows to higher-yielding developing countries.