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from George Chen:

China’s toxic leaks and social unrest

By George Chen
The opinions expressed are the author’s own.

What does PX mean? That's the keyword for China from the past 24 hours.

State media reported that residents of Dalian were recently forced to flee when a storm battering the northeast Chinese coast, whipping up waves that burst through a dyke protecting a local chemical plant. The plant produces paraxylene (PX), a toxic petrochemical used in polyester.

On Sunday, some angry residents finally decided that instead of being forced to flee, the chemical plant should be relocated.

Tens of thousands of people took to the streets to demonstrate and Dalian, known as one of the most beautiful coastal cities in China, made headlines all over the world.

Dalian is not alone.

Blame bad luck or natural disasters, perhaps. Four days ago, an accident at a factory in Shandong province resulted in a deadly chemical gas leak and 125 people, mostly workers and nearby residents, were sent to the hospital, local media reported. About three months ago, poisonous chemical waste was dumped illegally, polluting water sources in Yunnan province. The case was only recently revealed to the public. You can imagine how angry local people must feel.

from The Great Debate:

Five overlooked global risks

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Rafael Ramirez is James Martin Senior Research Fellow in Futures at Oxford University's Institute for Science, Innovation and Society. His latest book is "Business Planning for Turbulent Times: New Methods for Applying Scenarios" edited with John W. Selsky and Kees van der Heijden. -- Rafael Ramírez is the James Martin Senior Research Fellow in Futures at Oxford University and author of "Business Planning for Turbulent Times: New Methods for Applying Scenarios" edited with John W. Selsky and Kees van der Heijden. Ramírez attended a session at the World Economic Forum's gathering in Dalian, China, on managing global risks.

Reuters asked Ramírez to elaborate on five overlooked risks the world is confronting as it works its way through the current recession. His response is below. The views expressed are his own.

from The Great Debate:

Collaboration is the key to economic growth

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aron-cramer-- Aron Cramer is president and CEO of BSR, a global business network and consultancy focused on sustainability. The views expressed are his own. --

As the World Economic Forum’s “Summer Davos” meeting in Dalian, China, gets underway, it is a bit chilling to think back to how the financial crisis was unfolding in real time during last year’s event.

from The Great Debate UK:

Collaboration is the key to economic growth

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[CROSSPOST blog: 44 post: 5286]

Original Post Text:
aron-cramer-- Aron Cramer is president and CEO of BSR, a global business network and consultancy focused on sustainability. The views expressed are his own. --

As the World Economic Forum’s “Summer Davos” meeting in Dalian, China, gets underway, it is a bit chilling to think back to how the financial crisis was unfolding in real time during last year’s event.

from MacroScope:

Essential reading for tomorrow’s leaders

Amid the sessions on managing risk, sustainable consumption and lessons from the recession, it's refreshing to see that the World Economic Forum has carved out time to discuss the world of literature at its "summer Davos" meeting in Dalian, China. The aim of its panel on "Great Books for a Globalized World" is to ask, which classic and contemporary books from different cultures are essential for developing the personal values and professional philosophies of future leaders?

We asked one of the participants in the panel, Xie Youshun, professor of Chinese literature at the Sun Yat Sen University in Guangzhou, China , to give us his list. It's published below, right above the box where we invite your suggestions for essential reading for future leaders.

from MacroScope:

Live from Summer Davos

Reuters Editor-in-Chief David Schlesinger will be live-blogging from the "Summer Davos" meeting in Dalian China. We'll also be republishing related links of interest, from Twitter and elsewhere on the Web.

from The Great Debate:

Energy realism and a green recovery

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jay-pryor-- Jay R. Pryor is vice president of business development for Chevron. The views expressed are his own. --

The concept of a "green recovery" is a compelling topic of discussion at the World Economic Forum this week in Dailan, China. It stems from the United Nations Environment Program calling for investment of 1% of global GDP (nearly $750 billion) to promote a sustainable economic recovery.

from The Great Debate UK:

Energy realism and a green recovery

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[CROSSPOST blog: 44 post: 5228]

Original Post Text:
jay-pryor-- Jay R. Pryor is vice president of business development for Chevron. The views expressed are his own. --

The concept of a "green recovery" is a compelling topic of discussion at the World Economic Forum this week in Dailan, China. It stems from the United Nations Environment Program calling for investment of 1% of global GDP (nearly $750 billion) to promote a sustainable economic recovery.

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