Archive

Reuters blog archive

from Expert Zone:

If Europe gets into a debt crisis

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not necessarily those of Thomson Reuters)

Just over a week back, Europe appeared to be headed for another debt crisis, rattling global markets. Interest on Greece’s sovereign bonds shot up 9 percent. Others followed, including weaker countries like Spain, Portugal, Italy and, shockingly, France. Only Germany offered some protection to investors, albeit with a sharp decline in interest rate.

It appears difficult for countries in the European Union to manage their economies with a common currency.  With no economic instrument for currency adjustment and difficulties in fiscal maneuvering, the most likely outcome is sovereign default for countries with high debt-to-GDP ratio.

The European Central Bank (ECB) has adopted quantitative easing (QE) and announced it had bought 1.7 billion euro of bonds in the first week of the QE. The ECB also has negative interest rate on bank deposits. While this may stave off the debt crisis temporarily, the underlying problem may still force sovereign defaults.

from MacroScope:

Will rounding cents bring euro zone down?

The 18-country euro zone has had a rough ride in the past 6 years, and even with the glimmers of good news reaching the darkest corners of the debt crisis, the European Central Bank has been anything but ready to sound a crisis-over siren.

Right after ECB President Mario Draghi warned against undue optimism, the central bank has identified a new threat to the common currency's integrity - rounding up or down small change.

from The Great Debate:

Ending the debt limit crisis: Dear Ben Bernanke

Warren Buffett calls the debt ceiling a “nuclear weapon, too horrible to use.” Obama administration official Jason Furman says the consequence of a default on U.S. government debt is “too terrible to think about.” When asked about a default, Wells Fargo strategist James Kochan simply commented, “Holy cripes.”

With this crisis, America is risking financial Armageddon. The default of Lehman Brothers on its $613 billion of debt ignited a chain reaction in the financial system, nearly destroying the U.S. economy. A default by the U.S. government on $17 trillion of debt -- debt that has been considered the safest in the world -- could be far worse.

from MacroScope:

Elusive Greek deal

So euro zone finance ministers conferred about Greece and Germany’s Schaeuble came out to declare significant progress although no deal yet. Eurogroup head Jean-Claude Juncker looked forward to a final settlement at the ministers’ face-to-face meeting on Nov. 12.
But a source with no particular axe to grind was much more downbeat, saying there was no real progress with Germany and the IMF at loggerheads over the need for euro zone governments and the ECB to take a haircut on the Greek bonds they hold in order to make the numbers add up.

The IMF is convinced it is the only way, Germany will not countenance it.  So all sides remain far apart and that is without even taking account of a knife-edge parliamentary vote in Athens next week on labour reforms to cut wages and severance payments, which the EU and IMF insist are a key part of a new bailout deal, but which the smallest party in the coalition government has pledged to vote against.

from Global Investing:

UK investors warm to European stocks

British investors are warming up to European equities, with the highest level of positive or rather positive views of the troubled bloc's stocks in a year, an online survey by Baring Asset Management shows:

The biggest rise in sentiment was seen towards European equities, with over half (53%) of respondents saying they were now either ‘quite’ or ‘very’ favourable, up from 42% in the last survey and the most favourable they have been towards the European equity sector for a year.

from MacroScope:

An unpleasant surprise may lurk in euro zone GDP numbers

The euro zone economy may be doing far worse than most economists want to believe. That’s not good news for a central bank trying to rescue the single currency through a hotly-contested bond purchasing programme that has yet to get started.

The latest flash purchasing managers’ indexes, which cover thousands of euro zone companies, suggest the third quarter will mark the euro zone’s worst economic performance since the dark days of early 2009, according to Markit, which compiles them.

from Unstructured Finance:

UF Weekend Reads

By Katya Wachtel

Yes, Germany and Greece have been in a war of words in the unfolding crisis over the latter's membership in the euro zone, but this afternoon the two nations face off in a different (and far more entertaining) way: they go head-to-head in the European Championship quarterfinal.

As Reuters' Alexander Hudson reports from Poland, the setting of tonight's more-than-just-a-game battle, "When Greece take the football field in the Polish coastal city of Gdansk... the honor of the nation is at stake." Greece, by the way, has never beaten Germany on the soccer pitch.

from MacroScope:

Who expects euro bonds? Look outside the euro zone

It’s already been established that economists’ predictions about the euro zone’s future hinge largely on where their employer is based. Euro zone optimists tend to work for euro zone banks and research houses, and euro zone sceptics for companies based outside the currency union.

It somewhat undermined the idea their analyses are based purely on hard-headed economics, and less on national factors.

from MacroScope:

The dangers of a bloated ECB balance sheet

Central balance sheets across the industrialized world have increased rapidly in response to the financial crisis, as recently noted on this blog. In Europe, the balance sheet of the ECB and the 17 national central banks that share the euro currency has grown to around 3 trillion euros after the ECB injected more than a trillion into the market in 3-year loans and loosened its collateral standards.

At above 30 percent of gross domestic product, the ECB's balance sheet has overtaken that of the Bank of Japan, which has been grappling with deflation for some two decades and started from a much higher level. It is also bigger than that of the U.S. Federal Reserve, which has aggressively responded to two financial crises in five years by tripling the size of its balance sheet to nearly $3 trillion today.

from MacroScope:

An eerie euro zone calm

I don’t want to be the idiot who asked “is it all over?” … but is it all over?

Almost certainly not, is the answer. Greece is shored up for now but Portugal will probably need to follow it in seeking a second bailout and Spain, heading back into recession, will have to make deep, deep cuts over the next two years to meet EU deficit targets. Greek and French elections could easily upset the apple cart, the former producing a fractured government with less will to tread the austerity path, the latter a new president who wants to renegotiate the bloc’s new fiscal rules (though neither are guaranteed).

  •