The Cypriot crisis, stemming essentially from a banking malaise, reminds us that Europe's banking woes are far from over. In fact, Stephen Jen and Alexandra Dreisin at SLJ Macro Partners posit in a note on Monday that five years into the crisis, European banks have barely carried out any deleveraging. A look at their loan-to-deposit ratios  (a measure of a bank's liquidity, calculated by dividing total outstanding loans by total deposits) remain at an elevated 1.15. That's 60 percent higher than U.S. banks which went into the crisis with a similar LTD ratio but which have since slashed it to 0.7.