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from Photographers' Blog:

Shouting into the wind

Flood

Before I start please spare a thought for the thousands who died when Cyclone Nargis hit Myanmar and the thousands more affected by it, who have lost loved ones, their homes and their livelihoods.

For a news pictures editor in charge of Asia yesterday was a tough day. The death toll was rising steadily as the enormity of the tragedy slowly unfolded and we worked hard at getting pictures from staff and stringers. Handout pictures from pressure groups were scrutinized and checked for usage rights usage and potential bias. We had staff waiting at airports to speak to tourists who may have had images of the scene as the cyclone struck.

The day was a stream of planning meetings, coordination with text and TV meetings, safety meetings, negotiations with wide eyed tourists all believing they had shot a million dollar picture, editing and captioning the results, trying to find staff with the requisite experience for the conditions, stroking those who had volunteered but lacked the experience and speaking to the photographers on the ground (compared to whom my day was a walk in the park - no power, no water, no food was the least of their worries).

So what was all this stressing about? The bottom line is to tell the story, honestly, fairly and objectively so the rest of the world can see something of this disaster in one of the most closed and oppressively run countries in the world.

from India Insight:

Does India care about the tragedy in Myanmar?

I was a little shocked this morning to realise how little coverage the terrible tragedy in Myanmar has received from India's major newspapers.

People stand next to an advertisement tower that had fallen on a street in Yangon May 6, 2008, after Cyclone Nargis slammed into Myanmar's main city on Saturday. REUTERS/StringerLatest official estimates suggest 22,500 people have died and another 41,000 are missing in India's eastern neighbour -- a death toll comparable to Sri Lanka's experience in the 2004 tsunami, and one that could easily rise further.

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