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from Full Focus:

Surviving Sandy

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Photographer Mike Segar went to Staten Island where almost everyone he met had homes destroyed by hurricane Sandy. He found they had compelling stories of loss or survival to tell. The resulting 19 portraits show people who were born and raised in stable, long term communities who are now surrounded by devastated remains of houses that held generations of families. Read Mike's personal account of the project here.

from Photographers' Blog:

Inside the world’s biggest nuclear plant

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Kashiwazaki, Japan

By Kim Kyung-hoon

“Sleeping nuclear giants” - That was my first impression when I visited the world’s biggest nuclear power station, Kashiwazaki Kariwa power plant in Japan's Niigata Prefecture.

GALLERY: IMAGES FROM THE PLANT

With seven reactors which can produce a total of 8,212 megawatts of electricity, this power station is officially registered as the largest nuclear power station in the Guinness Book of Records. But the reality of the power station is much different than its reputation. Two of its reactors were shut down for a time after the 2007 earthquake and the remaining reactors were taken offline for safety checks and maintenance due to public concerns about the safety of nuclear energy in the quake-prone country after Fukushima’s nuclear disaster.

from Photographers' Blog:

Hong Kong’s National Day ferry disaster

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By Tyrone Siu

When the National Day fireworks ended in enthusiastic applause, most photographers – especially those who were functioning on an empty stomach like me - thought we could finally call it a night. After all, we had witnessed all the hustle and bustle since early in the day at the flag-raising ceremony. It was, we thought, perhaps enough sensation for a single day.

I was about to enjoy a nice hotpot dinner with other battered journalists after filing my fireworks pictures, when a reporter on site mentioned a brief report online that ruined the plan.

from Photographers' Blog:

Keeping safe in a quake-hit zone

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By Jason Lee

Around noon on September 7 two shallow earthquakes struck the mountainous area of Yiliang county of Yunnan province, China. I received my assignment to travel to the area at around 6 p.m. when the death toll reached 60.

SLIDESHOW: QUAKE AFTERMATH

As you can imagine, it is never easy to get to an earthquake-hit area. I had only 20 minutes to pack and prepare before a 3-hour flight. After that, I traveled another 8 hours by car followed by a one hour ride on the back of a motorcycle before reaching my destination. Along the road I didn’t see many collapsed buildings, but there were lots of giant rocks that had probably rolled down from mountains as the quake hit, as a result, many cars were smashed into pieces.

from Photographers' Blog:

Waist deep in Tropical Storm Debby

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By Brian Blanco

It's an awkward feeling walking through someone's home while photographing their children sloshing through rising floodwater in the living room. It is, I can assure you, another feeling entirely when that same homeowner yells down from the second floor, "It could be worse, at least we still have power" as I look over to see the electrical outlets mere seconds away from being submerged. These are the moments that help to remind me that there are dangers involved in covering just about any natural disaster and that it's important not to be complacent just because a named storm may "only" be a tropical storm, as was the case with Tropical Storm Debby.

SLIDESHOW: DEBBY SLAMS FLORIDA

As a Florida-based photojournalist I've covered more named storms than I can recall, ranging from those forgettable storms that, thankfully, produced little more than twigs in the street, to the now infamous Hurricane Katrina. I'll admit that I was initially guilty of underestimating this storm. After getting the call from Reuters to cover Tropical Storm Debby, I was packing my car when my wife popped into the garage to tell me to be careful and I scoffed and said, "Oh Honey it's "just" a tropical storm. I'll go make some rain features and be back in a couple of days." As it turns out, I was wrong, this storm caused more damage from flooding and tornadoes than I've ever seen a tropical storm cause. It ended up touching a lot of lives and, in meeting those affected, touched my life as well.

from Photographers' Blog:

Cruising to Venice

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By Stefano Rellandini

Venice has always been a peculiar destination for everyone who visits. As a town built on water it appears somewhat atypical; no cars, no motorcycles, not even any bikes. The only way to travel through the city is to walk or use the gondolas, the traditional boats of Venice.

Ships are primarily used to reach Venice and in recent years these have become bigger and bigger. Every weekend seven or eight arrive at the lagoon of Venice. They then sail in front of San Marco square to reach the harbor.

from Photographers' Blog:

Angels of Parmesan

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By Stefano Rellandini

It all started one night as I looked for some Parmesan cheese to add to my pasta at home. I wondered what the situation was two weeks after an earthquake struck the area of Emilia, the home of Parmesan cheese. After dinner I searched online for some news on the subject and found a lovely story about a team of firefighters who went to the affected areas to help recover the damaged cheese.

Around Finale Emilia, the epicenter of the latest earthquake, there are many factories producing Parmesan which, alongside agriculture, is the core business of the region.

from India Insight:

Assam ferry tragedy not newsy enough?

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On Monday, India's remote northeastern state of Assam saw probably its biggest tragedy in recent memory, when an overloaded ferry carrying about 300 people sank in the Brahmaputra river, killing at least 103 people.

However, the bigger tragedy perhaps was the minimal coverage it got in the national media. Apart from The Hindu, which had the accident as its top story, none of the leading dailies in the country gave it much coverage beyond a mention on the front page.

from Photographers' Blog:

Chance meeting 14 years on

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By Andrew Winning

14 years ago this November I travelled to Nicaragua to cover one of the deadliest hurricanes to hit central America. Hurricane Mitch, the strongest October storm on record, ground to a halt just off the coasts of Nicaragua and Honduras and brought almost two weeks of torrential rain down on the whole region. Rivers and streams became raging torrents as flash floods and mudslides left a trail of devastation and claimed over 9,000 lives.

With roads and infrastructure washed away the only way to reach the affected communities was by helicopter. Mexico, the United States and other countries lent theirs to help Nicaragua cope with the task of ferrying aid to populations cut off by the flooding and collecting the sick and injured for treatment in the capital.

from Photographers' Blog:

Rocking and Rolling on the Titanic Memorial Cruise

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By Chris Helgren

In what resembles a Trekkie convention gone through a time portal, hundreds of passengers on the Titanic Memorial Cruise, retracing the Titanic's voyage from Southampton 100 years later, now divide their time between promenading in the latest fashions of 100 years ago and debating the true color of Titanic’s funnels. Yellow, but what kind of yellow? Model maker Kenneth Mascarenhas and painter James Allen Flood don’t see eye to eye on the subject, and it’s suggested that fellow passenger Commodore Warwick should adjudicate the issue. After all, he saw the Titanic wreck in a submersible. However, Mascarenhas fails to take into account that the ship is now rusted through and covered with Oceanic mud, its funnels probably covered in barnacles.

Actually, there are plenty of things to do on board the MS Balmoral. I missed the “fluid retention and swollen ankles seminar” on Monday, but there’s been a parade of Titanic experts on show to fill us in on everything one would want to know (except the color of funnels). Sadly, due to the inclement weather, shuffleboard has been cancelled the last two days. As has a dance show, due to health and safety concerns. Many of my fellow passengers have been sighted hunched over, unable to promenade, green with seasickness.

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