from The Great Debate:

Fighting discrimination, as inequality grows

By Bill Schneider
August 28, 2013

I grew up in the segregated South. I tell students the story of how, as a young boy, I went with my mother to Bloomberg's Department Store on High Street in Portsmouth, Virginia. There was a stack of doilies on the ladies' hat counter and I asked my mother what they were for. She explained that a black woman had to put a doily on her head before trying on a hat, because a white woman would not purchase a hat that had been on a black woman's head.

from Photographers' Blog:

Swimming by Seatrac

August 9, 2013

Alepochori, Greece

By Yorgos Karahalis

In Greece, with its hundreds of islands, one of the longest coastlines in the world and a great climate, people are lucky enough to enjoy the beach for nearly half the year. Swimming in the sea is a way of life for many Greeks and a habit they’ve grown used to from their earliest years. With tourism being the country’s biggest industry, almost all visitors plan at least one “touch” with the sea during their holiday.

from Alison Frankel:

2nd Circuit squelches Title VII exception to mandatory arbitration

By Alison Frankel
March 21, 2013

The 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals has been known on occasion to buck the judicial trend of deference to arbitration and champion plaintiffs' rights to class action litigation. But not if the only justification for classwide litigation is a phantom statutory right. In a notably short and emphatic decision issued Thursday in a closely watched sex discrimination case against Goldman Sachs, a three-judge appellate panel reversed a lower-court ruling that former Goldman managing director Lisa Parisi may pursue a class action despite the mandatory arbitration clause in her employment contract. The appeals court agreed with just about every argument by Goldman's lawyers at Sullivan & Cromwell, ruling that the bank's arbitration clause does not preclude Parisi's statutory rights under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act because she has no private cause of action to claim that her employer engaged in a pattern or practice of discrimination.

from Photographers' Blog:

Yemen’s “untouchables”

November 12, 2012

Houdieda, Yemen

By Khaled Abdullah

The “Arab Spring” revolutions have helped societies in countries throughout the Middle East achieve hopes of change. But in Yemen, one group is still a long way from achieving its dreams.

from FaithWorld:

Islamic bloc drops 12-year U.N. drive to ban defamation of religion

March 24, 2011

(U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton addresses the high level segment of the 16th session of the Human Rights Council at the United Nations European headquarters in Geneva, February 28, 2011. REUTERS/Valentin Flauraud)

(U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton addresses the Human Rights Council in Geneva and urges it "to move beyond a decade-long debate over whether insults to religion should be banned or criminalised," February 28, 2011/Valentin Flauraud)

from FaithWorld:

British Christian couple loses foster ruling over gays stance

March 1, 2011

london court

(The Royal Courts of Justice, 18 April 2003/Michael Reeve)

A British Christian couple opposed to homosexuality because of their faith lost a court battle in London on Monday over the right to become foster carers. The couple, who are Pentecostal Christians, had gone to court after a social worker expressed concerns about them becoming respite carers after they said they could not tell a child that a "homosexual lifestyle" was acceptable.

from FaithWorld:

Support for UN vote against defaming religion wanes

November 24, 2010

ungaA U.N. General Assembly committee has once again voted to condemn the "vilification of religion" but support narrowed for a measure that Western powers say is a threat to freedom of expression. The non-binding resolution, championed by Islamic states and opposed by Western countries, passed by only 12 votes on Tuesday in the General Assembly's Third Committee, which focuses on human rights, 76-64 with 42 abstentions.

from FaithWorld:

Condemned Christian woman seeks mercy in Pakistan

By Reuters Staff
November 20, 2010

bibiA Christian woman sentenced to death in Pakistan on charges of blaspheming Islam said on Saturday she had been wrongfully accused by neighbours due to a personal dispute, and appealed to the president to pardon her.

from FaithWorld:

Factbox-U.S. cites repression of religious freedom around the world

November 17, 2010

The United States on Wednesday unveiled its annual survey of religious freedom, citing countries ranging from North Korea to Eritrea as repressing religious liberties.

from FaithWorld:

“MOOZ-lum” film depicts challenges for black U.S. Muslims

By Reuters Staff
September 22, 2010

mooz-lumThe makers of a new movie about family life for black Muslims in America want to highlight challenges facing followers of Islam, just as Spike Lee's "Do the Right Thing" revealed the racism and harsh realities facing black youth in Brooklyn two decades ago.