from John Lloyd:

Lessons of Ebola: Unequal in life, unequal in death

By John Lloyd
October 20, 2014

Health worker is reflected in a mirror as he prepares protective equipment near Rokupa Hospital

The most important and tragic speech of these times was given earlier this week, though the author was too busy to voice it herself. Dr. Margaret Chan, who leads the World Health Organization, sent her chief of staff to a WHO regional conference in Manila to spotlight something we rarely keep in our conscious mind and don't, collectively, do much about: Inequalities can be a matter of ever-longer life, or a most miserable death.

from Breakingviews:

Ebola shows dangers, and power, of globalisation

By Edward Hadas
October 10, 2014

By Edward Hadas

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Breakingviews:

Fear is key to Ebola’s economic contagion

August 18, 2014

By Una Galani

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

from The Great Debate:

Remember the movie ‘Outbreak?’ Yeah, Ebola’s not really like that.

By Celine Gounder
August 14, 2014

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The Ebola outbreak continues to spread in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, the countries hardest hit by the disease. More than 1,000 people have now died from the virus. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued its highest-level alert for a response to the Ebola crisis. The World Health Organization has declared the outbreak a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. The disease is intensifying in West Africa, but the epidemic poses minimal risk to Americans. So why are we so afraid?

from The Human Impact:

Frontline reflections on Guinea’s battle against Ebola

By Misha Hussain
May 6, 2014

 

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Nobody would have thought that Gueckedou, a market town in southern Guinea, was the front line in West Africa’s battle against the deadly Ebola virus.

from The Human Impact:

Can the world get rid of tuberculosis?

March 25, 2014

It would be easy to think that tuberculosis is under control. TB, one of the world’s top two infectious disease killers, has been declining slowly but steadily and in some parts of the world it has been almost eradicated.

from The Human Impact:

Q+A- Sierra Leone cholera outbreak spreading unusually quickly – ChildFund

September 11, 2012

Poor road networks and heavy rains are limiting the ability of aid workers to accelerate the fight against a severe cholera outbreak in Sierra Leone, which has claimed the lives of at least 250 people and infected more than 15,000, according to charity ChildFund International.

from Photographers' Blog:

Hope in the fight against AIDS

July 23, 2012

By Mike Segar

The photos in this project, conceived ahead of this week's International AIDS Conference, are not the dramatic, heartbreaking, moving sort that we have been used to seeing of AIDS patients from the ‘80s and ‘90s. What I came to quickly realize is that this story, or I should say this portion of it, is about hope - hope and recovery. Living and learning to live as best one can with a disease the world has come to know all too well as an indiscriminate killer.

from The Human Impact:

How can contraception cut child deaths?

July 10, 2012

LONDON (TrustLaw) - It’s well known that good family planning vastly reduces the risk of women dying from pregnancy complications and helps prevent miscarriages and still births.

from The Human Impact:

Researchers hope to reduce sub-Saharan Africa newborn deaths

May 15, 2012

Clinical trials are underway to test a new treatment for pregnant women, which could tackle some of the leading preventable causes of death for babies in sub-Saharan Africa, researchers at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) have said.