from Photographers' Blog:

Los Angeles: the World in a City

October 30, 2014

Los Angeles, United States

By Lucy Nicholson      

Show biz, sunshine, surfing and traffic are some of the first images that come to mind when people picture Los Angeles.

from The Great Debate:

Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert liberal lions? The guest chair tells a different story.

By Chloe Angyal
August 22, 2014

RTX8SHJ.jpg

The summer of 2014 will likely go down in American journalistic history as one of the most news-heavy summers in decades. Ukraine, Gaza and now Ferguson have gripped the attention of those who cover and consume the news.

from Breakingviews:

White male banker jabs at finance’s glass ceiling

November 11, 2013

By Peter Thal Larsen

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from The Great Debate:

Clinton: The newest New Democrat

By Bill Schneider
July 25, 2013

Democrats have a history of plucking presidential candidates out of obscurity: Jimmy Carter, Michael Dukakis, Bill Clinton, Barack Obama. Republicans are supposed to go for whomever is next in line, particularly if they have run before: Richard M. Nixon, George H.W. Bush, Bob Dole, John McCain, Mitt Romney.

from Felix Salmon:

Annals of gender diversity, Pimco edition

By Felix Salmon
April 1, 2013

Over the past three years or so, Pimco has been making a concerted effort with respect to gender equality and women's empowerment. And this effort is being led from the very top: check out CEO Mohamed El-Erian's speech to USAID last year, or his more recent rave review of Sheryl Sandberg's book. El-Erian is clearly committed to overcoming institutional biases at Pimco and to ensuring that his company "employs, enables, develops, stimulates, and retains" the very best workforce it can -- including, of course, the very best women.

from Chrystia Freeland:

Making the most of diversity

By Chrystia Freeland
November 16, 2012

For America, 2012 will go down in history as the year of the Latinos, the blacks, the women and the gays. That rainbow coalition won President Barack Obama his second term. This triumph of the outsiders is partly due to America's changing demographics. And it is not just the United States that is becoming more diverse. Canada is, too, as is much of Europe.

from The Great Debate:

Where Karl Rove was right

By Gregory Rodriguez
November 8, 2012

Give Karl Rove a break. His meltdown on election night may not have been entirely about Fox News prematurely calling Ohio for President Barack Obama. After all, the poor guy had every right to get upset while watching the Republican Party nominee’s campaign crash and burn.

from Unstructured Finance:

Diversity on Wall Street, or a lack thereof

March 30, 2012

By Matthew Goldstein

The shooting death of Trayvon Martin, an unarmed black teen in Florida, has evoked a lot of debate about race in America and the nation’s attitudes to what it means to be a minority.

from Lucy P. Marcus:

Why Facebook – and every company – needs a diverse board

By Lucy P. Marcus
February 8, 2012

On Tuesday, the California State Teachers' Retirement System (CalSTRS), the second-largest pension fund in the United States, wrote to Facebook to address the fact that the company has an unusually small, insular board with no women. With this bold and public step, CalSTRS brought to the fore an issue of genuine concern: diversity in the boardroom.

from Felix Salmon:

There’s nothing fabulis about Citibank

By Felix Salmon
February 26, 2010

Jennifer Valentino-DeVries has a good post on l'affair Fabulis, in which a gay entrepreneur named Jason Goldberg was told by Citibank that his website "was not in compliance with Citibank’s standard policies" before receiving a fulsome apology from Bill Brown, the head of branch banking in New York. (Goldberg's been blogging on this a lot; the best way to see everything is just to go to his blog home page.)