from The Great Debate:

Are too-big-to-fail banks being cut down to size?

By Charles R. Morris
August 7, 2014

Financial institution representatives are sworn in before testifying at the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington

The massive $16-billion mortgage fraud settlement agreement just reached by Bank of America and federal authorities -- only the latest in a string of such settlements -- makes it easy to lose sight of what good shape banks are in.

from The Great Debate:

Massad: Taking the reins on derivative reforms

April 9, 2014

The Senate Agriculture Committee met Tuesday to approve the nomination of Tim Massad as chairman of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, even as the agency fumbles over the definition of a “swap.”

from Alison Frankel:

In new amicus brief, SEC wants to protect whistleblowers – and itself

By Alison Frankel
February 21, 2014

In 2012 and 2013, when the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals was considering the question of whether Dodd-Frank's anti-retaliation provisions protect whistleblowers who report their concerns internally, rather than to the Securities and Exchange Commission, the SEC stayed out of the fray. The case, Khaled Asadi v. G.E. Energy, centered on the tension between two sections of Dodd-Frank, one of which seemed to define whistleblowers only as those who tip the SEC about potential misconduct by their employers. In its Dodd-Frank implementation process, the SEC attempted to resolve the tension, issuing rules to clarify that whistleblowers are protected from retaliation regardless of whether they report concerns to the agency or up the chain of command through internal compliance programs, as the older Sarbanes-Oxley Act had encouraged. The SEC's rules have convinced most of the federal trial judges who have considered the scope of Dodd-Frank whistleblower protections; courts have typically cited the deference due to the agency's interpretation of a law it is responsible for enforcing.

from The Great Debate UK:

Regulatory convergence is inevitable for global markets

By Guest Contributor
November 11, 2013

--Gregg Beechey is a Partner in the Financial Institutions Group at law firm King and Wood Mallesons SJ Berwin. The opinions expressed are his own.--

from Ian Bremmer:

An optimist’s view of the White House

By Ian Bremmer
November 8, 2013

What will the White House screw up next? Democrats have watched as one calamity after another has befallen what was once the most promising Democratic administration since John F. Kennedy’s. Obamacare, the NSA, Syria, heck, even the administration’s campaign foibles are back in the news with the publication of the new tell-all book Double Down.

from MuniLand:

Dodd-Frank appears in muniland

By Cate Long
October 10, 2013

Already the long reach of Dodd-Frank into muniland is having an effect. Al.com tells the story (emphasis mine):

from The Great Debate:

An agenda to boost Africa’s economy

By Eliot Pence
August 30, 2013

A lot can happen in a year. This time last year, U.S. businesses and NGOs bemoaned the Obama administration's perceived indifference to Africa. Now, they’re trying to find out how to catch the wave of interest. Major new initiatives, including Power Africa and Trade Africa, unveiled during President Obama’s first true trip to Africa this summer, as well as a reinvigorated push to renew the African Growth and Opportunity Act fully two years before it's due to expire, have given U.S.-Africa watchers a lot to consider. But what -- and when -- is enough for U.S. policy in Africa? What more can be done in the year ahead? How do things really shake out for investors, civil society and Africans? Here are three additional areas the Administration should consider as it deepens its commitment to the continent:

from Alison Frankel:

Does Dodd-Frank protect foreign whistle-blowers?

By Alison Frankel
August 14, 2013

In the first full year of operation for the Securities and Exchange Commission's Dodd-Frank whistle-blower program, the agency received 324 tips from whistle-blowers working outside of the United States - almost 11 percent of all the whistle-blower reports received by the SEC. If those tips eventually result in sanctions of more than $1 million, the SEC whistle-blowers will be in line for bounties. But if they're fired by their companies for disclosing corporate wrongdoing, they may not be able to sue under Dodd-Frank because the law's anti-retaliation protection for whistle-blowers does not specify that it extends overseas. And as you know, the U.S. Supreme Court's 2010 ruling in Morrison v. National Australia Bank holds that civil laws should be presumed not to apply overseas unless they say otherwise.

from Alison Frankel:

Appeals court restricts Dodd-Frank protection for whistle-blowers

By Alison Frankel
July 18, 2013

If Khaled Asadi, a former GE Energy executive who lost his job after alerting his boss to concerns that GE might have run afoul of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, had sued his old employer in New York or Connecticut, things might have worked out differently for him. Several federal trial judges in those jurisdictions have ruled that whistle-blowers who report corporate wrongdoing internally are protected by the Dodd-Frank Act of 2010, even though the statute defines whistle-blowers as employees who report securities violations to the Securities and Exchange Commission. But Asadi, who worked in GE Energy's office in Amman, Jordan, filed a claim that the company had illegally retaliated against him in federal district court in Houston. And on Wednesday, the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals - with hardly a nod to contrary lower-court decisions in other circuits - ruled that Asadi is not a whistle-blower under Dodd-Frank because he talked to his boss and not the SEC.

from MacroScope:

Raskin’s warning: ‘Shouldn’t pretend’ Fed capital rules are a panacea

July 10, 2013

Post corrected to show Brooksley Born is a former head of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) not a former Fed board governor.