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from Photographers' Blog:

Lost dogs of Romania

 Bucharest, Romania

By Bogdan Cristel

I love dogs. I grew up with them around me all the time and I remember always having one with me when I played in my grandpa’s yard as a child.

Our dogs, just like thousands of others in Bucharest, were kept in the family garden. But everything changed in the city after former Communist dictator Nicolae Ceausescu began a project to erase old houses with backyards and replace them with huge high-rise blocks.

As a result of the mass demolitions, many dogs were turned out on the streets and the number of strays increased year after year. Some 60,000 dogs roam the capital according to local authorities.

 

Thousands of people are victim to their bites and when in September 2013 a child was mauled to death, Romania’s government went into action. Parliament overwhelmingly backed a new law allowing local authorities to euthanize dogs caught in public spaces if a home could not be found for them within two weeks.

from Photographers' Blog:

The crime of dog kidnapping

Mexico City, Mexico

By Edgard Garrido

A woman approached me while I was taking pictures of a leaflet with information on a purebred dog that had gone missing in Parque Mexico. She was on a bike and she had a dog with her whose head easily reached my belly. She asked me if I was doing a story and she introduced herself as Mariam Luzcan “a protector of dogs and a true dog lover”. She was dressed in black and covered with what I suppose was dog hair and lots of dirt, she smelled like dog too. But I liked her so we agreed to meet again in a couple of days and do a story together on missing dogs.

In Mexico City, dog kidnapping has become another way of making an illegal, but quick, buck. It is becoming more common as many of the capital dwellers own lots of dogs. And I mean lots - not one or two, but four or even six or seven pooches at a time. Of course there is a wide range of businesses dedicated to the well-being of man’s best friend. There are dog hairdressers, dog clothing lines, specialty food stores, dog hotels, companies that arrange adoptions for “orphaned” dogs, security for dogs, massages for dogs, crematoriums for dogs, you name it.

from Photographers' Blog:

Flying with man’s best friend

Salt Lake City, Utah

By Jim Urquhart

Peanuts cartoonist Charles Schulz once said, “All his life he tried to be a good person. Many times, however, he failed. For after all, he was only human. He wasn't a dog.”

For me there is a simple truth in that statement. I have many failings and weaknesses that I am continually trying to learn from. Some I am just learning to accept, new ones get pointed out daily by others. That is just me. But I have the privilege of owning and caring for a dog.

from Emanuel Derman:

Dog’s Lives

I am in Santa Fe, NM, about to spend a few weeks at the Santa Fe Institute where I hope to learn something about market microstructure and agent-based models.

Everyone in Santa Fe (i.e. the few people I've met thru work here in the past -- I wrote a chapter of Models.Behaving.Badly here in 2009, using their excellent library) seems to think Santa Fe is paradise on earth, and maybe it is, though I prefer paradise on the seashore. I  have this atavistic urge to find a place that is easygoing but has access to culture, and yet lets you back off from the discontents and irritations of politics and corporations. People here seem to think this is it. But, I should add, people here seem to be close to retirement.

from Photographers' Blog:

Los Galgos Guapos (The Handsome Hounds)

By Erin Siegal

I'd never really known a galgo, or greyhound. To me, they were simply those weirdly skinny creatures in the NYC dog runs that looked like yawning alligators when panting, so rail-thin that they practically disappeared unless they turned sideways.

But now?

Well, let's just say that I think Dreamboat's name is pretty accurate.


"Dreamboat," a.k.a. U.S.S. Dreamboat, enjoys a bath.

In Tijuana, Mexico, the Caliente racetrack is famous. In the city's heyday, high-end thoroughbreds charged past glamorous crowds of onlookers; photos of the horses still adorn the walls in the casino's basement administrative offices. Today, however, a different kind of animal bursts from the starting gates each day: American greyhounds.

from Oddly Enough Blog:

The best goofy but true stories from 2011

As I said recently in a post which began a countdown to tomorrow's final entry in this blog, one of the things I have enjoyed most is presenting stories that are goofy but true.

Sure, it's fun to make up funny stuff and riff on news photos, but real life often finds a way to top me.

from Oddly Enough Blog:

What year is it again?

Welcome back to a regular feature we call, "What Year is it Again?" in which we relate true events that make us question whether we've gone back in time for decades, maybe even centuries.

For instance, I was looking at a very nice photo series about guide dogs in Peru, but I noticed the captions said that shops, banks and buses don't allow blind people to enter with their guide dogs.

from Oddly Enough Blog:

I Hope You’re Proud Of Yourself!

Hey Blog Guy, it's September 14th. This is the day you announce the coveted annual I Hope You're Proud Of Yourself! award.

Yes, I'm sorry for the delay. I was all set to give this year's trophy to the folks at that Tea Party presidential debate on Monday.

from Oddly Enough Blog:

Obama’s golden opportunity?

Okay staff, we all know we've got a problem. The president isn't as popular as he used to be. His numbers are down, and the Republicans are slinging mud. Anybody got an idea?

Uh, could he save a small child from a burning runaway freight train, Boss?

Hmmmm. Not bad, Lamar, but he's done that twice already. I think he needs something different this time.

from Photographers' Blog:

Chile’s dog days

By Ivan Alvarado

Today it seems the dictatorship ended only recently….

A newspaper front page shows a dog participating in the demonstrations in Chile. It seems that anything can happen these troubled days around the world, so between slogans and statements it makes sense to write a blog about street dogs and demonstrations.

“Free quality education.” - Student movement
“Nothing is free in life.” - President Sebastian Pinera
“Education should not be for profit.” - Student movement
“Gang of useless subversives.” - Carlos Larrain, president of the ruling party
“We don’t need mediators, and especially not from the Catholic Church.” - Camila Vallejo, student leader.
“It’s going to fall, it’s going to fall….the education of Pinochet.” – Demonstrators.
“Education is a commodity.” – President Pinera.
“The government exaggerates the students’ claims to demonize them.” - Mario Waissbluth, expert on education.
“The only thing they [the demonstrators] want to do is destroy the country and us.” – Chile’s National Police.
“I’m a gardener and I want my son to be an engineer.” – Street graffiti.

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