from Unstructured Finance:

Jeffrey Gundlach, on his year as new ‘King of Bonds’

By Jennifer Ablan
December 15, 2014

Gundlach, star bond investor and head of DoubleLine Capital LP,  is photographed during an interview in New YorkWhen Bill Gross shocked the investment world on Sept. 26 by storming out of Pimco, the most prominent bond investor in the world didn’t stop leaving people stunned.
It was later revealed by Reuters that Gross had paid an unlikely visit to his fiercest rival: Jeffrey Gundlach.
For two decades, the two had no relationship or interaction at all, even though their personas were intertwined, compared and contrasted often in the financial media and by other bond market players. (Morningstar named Gross "Fixed Income Manager of the Decade" in 2010, an award for which Gundlach was a finalist. Then in 2011, Barron's magazine anointed Gundlach as the new King of Bonds.)
Gross not only unexpectedly departed his firm for under-the-radar Janus Capital but also considered joining Gundlach’s DoubleLine Capital. Gundlach said the so-called “Dream Team” didn’t work out but “you never know what will happen in the future.”
Overall, the gesture by Gross officially affirmed the investment world’s long-held view that Gundlach had been anointed the new Bond King.
What follows are excerpts of my hour-long interview – unfortunately, not on the north loggia of Gundlach's Los Angeles home -- about Gundlach’s investment calls (old and news ones), his competitors, the future of fixed income and his firm’s fifth year anniversary which was celebrated on Sunday.

from Expert Zone:

How to get India’s exports back on track

November 21, 2014

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not necessarily those of Thomson Reuters)

from Expert Zone:

If Europe gets into a debt crisis

October 29, 2014

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not necessarily those of Thomson Reuters)

from Global Investing:

Strong dollar, weak oil and emerging markets growth

October 17, 2014

Many emerging economies have been banking on weaker currencies to revitalise economic growth.  Oil's 25 percent fall in dollar terms this year should also help. The problem however is the dollar's strength which is leading to a general tightening of monetary conditions worldwide, more so in countries where central banks are intervening to prevent their currencies from falling too much.

from Morning Bid with David Gaffen:

Simple Tricks and Nonsense

October 10, 2014

Heading into the end of a violent week and ahead of a slew of earnings reports, the market has swung from one extreme to another, as the average daily move in the S&P 500 rises dramatically, as futures promise another big drop at the open Friday, and as investors try to take stock of what's happening here in their beloved stock market.

from Morning Bid with David Gaffen:

Speak softly, and carry a big helicopter

October 9, 2014

Days like Wednesday are the ones that remind investors why the Federal Reserve is what it is, and how some believe the other world central banks cannot compete, even as some expect the European Central Bank and Bank of Japan (to an extent) to take up the slack the Fed will leave behind when it ends quantitative easing in the next weeks and prepares for its first interest-rate hike some time in the third quarter.

from Morning Bid with David Gaffen:

Five and Five

October 8, 2014

Just when the market thought it was out, it got pulled back in. The Federal Reserve will release its minutes later in the day that details what it was thinking during its most recent September policy meeting, but of late, the markets have been of a mind that the expectations for higher rates ought to be tempered a bit.

from Morning Bid with David Gaffen:

Dollar bulls, equity bears

October 6, 2014

The preparation for tighter U.S. monetary policy is showing up in markets in a number of areas, most notably through the appreciation of the dollar which has a greater affect on GDP growth than people sometimes realize. Rising strength in the greenback, which would be expected to continue given the dovish monetary policies being pursued in Europe and Japan, turns into notable weakness in a number of U.S. sectors tied to exports like autos and energy.

from David Gaffen:

MORNING BID – For a few dollars more

September 22, 2014

The dollar is now running a 10-week streak of strengthening (using the dollar index, which is a basket of currencies but mostly the euro and yen), and while that streak will end at some point, the overall trend does not look likely to abate in the near-term. That presents some interesting opportunities in markets, trends that have already been playing out but are likely too to persist as investors concentrate more on companies less exposed to areas like Europe and more exposed to the United States.

from Counterparties:

MORNING BID – Apres Fed, le Deluge

September 18, 2014

The Kremlinologists turned out to be right, and the Federal Reserve left its "considerable time" language in its statement to assure the markets that it would be around for a while longer with rock bottom rates. It's the divergent (to a point) reaction out of the markets themselves that is interesting to parse, and will be key to watch in coming weeks and months. The action in the stock market was to suggest the entire exercise was a snooze-fest, with stocks ending marginally higher (yes, the Dow at a new record) but not too far from where the major averages were trading just before the news. Which is to say the equity market, always the most optimistic of U.S. markets, has it in mind that low rates stay for now, and until "now" is "then," it's time to party.