from Raw Japan:

Another Sunday night on the Pacific Ring of Fire

August 10, 2009

JAPANSunday night's strong but uneventful 6.9 magnitude earthquake reminded all in greater Tokyo that these are indeed volatile times, tectonically speaking.

from Global News Journal:

A month after quake, gratitude turns to impatience

May 8, 2009

A month after an earthquake killed nearly 300 people in Italy, the initial goodwill towards authorities for their swift handling of the disaster appears to be giving way to anger as survivors face an uncertain wait for promised funds and the prospect of a long summer in tents.

from Our Take on Your Take:

The emotion of covering Italy’s quake

April 10, 2009

Davide Elias is a regular contributor to Your View and in the following blog recounts his experience covering the devastating earthquake in L'Aquila.

from Photographers' Blog:

Be prepared!

July 4, 2008

"ALWAYS get to the scene as soon as possible", is a mantra for the Tokyo picture team. It is advice which features prominently in the pocket-sized guide to emergency coverage procedures produced by our boss Michael Caronna - a guide which has also become indispensible in everyday coverage too. 

from Photographers' Blog:

Walking with survivors: Audio slideshow

June 16, 2008

Shanghai-based photographer Nir Elias tells of his hike with survivors of the Sichuan quake.

from Photographers' Blog:

Aftermath of a quake: Audio slideshow

June 16, 2008

A showcase of David's Gray images of the aftermath of the Sichuan earthquake are set to music in this audio slideshow.

from Photographers' Blog:

Earthquake in China – a photographer’s view

June 3, 2008

1. Dujiangyan, 2: 30 am, May 13th.

In misty light I arrived at Chongqing Airport with my TV colleague Royston. We drove straight toward Dujiangyan, with rain spitting gloomily and the air damply hazing my breath. The city seemed as though the Big Bang had just happened, everything had stopped. The crying and sirens all around made me dizzy and I cannot really remember how I arrived at the ruins of what had once been a school, with its 900 pupils buried in the rubble. A rescue team was desperately looking for anybody still alive, while I stood on the mountain of dust and the dead, shooting pictures. The sound of the shutter seemed to me to be like death itself scratching away.

from Photographers' Blog:

Earthquake in China – a view from Beijing

June 3, 2008

It happened and it just happened, quietly but tangibly ...  it only lasted 5 seconds...
 
May 12, 2008, 2:28 pm on the button, I was stooping to pick up a gift before rushing off to visit a client with two colleagues. The sudden dizzy feeling made me mentally rebuke myself for skipping breakfast and lunch; in those 5 seconds, I swore to myself never to do it again if I had to attend a formal meeting. But of course, my expressions remained calm. 
 
"It's an earthquake", a sharp yet clear voice from the corner of the office broke this temporary silence which instinctively ignited my relief of being faint. "Hey buddy, maybe you are not so bad", I said to myself.
 
So, that is how it started ... on a normal working day, it just happened.
 
No worries, we had already had contingency plans...
 
Photographers immediately  rushed to the airport, we skipped the client visit and began to tackle the breaking story. From that moment, for the first time ever, the Beijing Pix Desk began running 24/7 with three editors: Grace Liang, Reinhard Krause and myself.
 
The first pictures of white collars wandering downstairs after escaping from a shaking Beijing office building hit the wire 10 minutes after the quake struck while we continued moving pix from around China showing general damage like burst water pipes and cracked walls.  

from Photographers' Blog:

Covering the quake: Audio slideshow

May 30, 2008

David Gray recounts his experience covering the earthquake that devastated Sichuan province, China.

from Our Take on Your Take:

Face to face with a survivor

May 30, 2008

ywtear.jpg

Bauhaus Wang brings a human face to the devastation caused by the quake in China through his portrait of a survivor.