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from Breakingviews:

ECB’s trillion-euro race may start slowly

By Neil Unmack

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

The latest parlour game in financial markets is guessing the size of the European Central Bank’s upcoming four-year targeted long-term liquidity operations (TLTROs): how many banks will tap the ECB, for how much?

Mario Draghi’s stated goal is to grow the ECB balance sheet back to its 2012 level, or about 3 trillion euros. If banks’ enthusiasm for the first facility is subdued – for example if they ask for less than 100 billion euros - markets may react by pushing up the euro – which might in turn force the ECB to embark on more ambitious sovereign bond purchases – so-called “quantitative easing.”

So far the ECB has announced an estimated 1 trillion euros through TLTROs – beginning Sept. 18 and lasting through 2016. But 350 billion euros of older, three-year loans are maturing soon. And roughly 150 billion euros of past government bond purchases will do so in coming years. That implies 500 billion euros of net lending. The ECB bill will also acquire asset-backed securities and covered bonds.

from Breakingviews:

Euro has further to fall

By Swaha Pattanaik

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

Euro zone inflation is too low, and economic activity sluggish. But at least one thing is going the European Central Bank’s way. Its hankering for a weaker currency will be fully gratified.

from MacroScope:

The ECB keeps putting up the cash, but where’s the lending?

Draghi and TrichetFor the European Central Bank, a lot is riding on euro zone banks ramping up lending to the private sector. Unfortunately, after a very long time, lending still is not growing. It fell 1.6 percent on a year ago in July.

Struggling with a dangerously low inflation rate that is expected to dip even further to 0.3 percent in August, the ECB placed a big bet back in June that hundreds of billions of euros more in cash for banks in further liquidity auctions in October and December this year would help turn the situation around.

from Breakingviews:

ECB deserves to lose market’s inflation confidence

By Swaha Pattanaik

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own. 

The case of the euro zone’s vanishing inflation rate has so far stumped European Central Bank President Mario Draghi. Quite rightly, investors’ faith in his ability to do anything about the problem is also evaporating.

from Global Markets Forum Dashboard:

A very German problem for the ECB

The clock is ticking down to the European Central Bank’s policy meeting tomorrow and markets are waiting to see what the bank’s president, Mario Draghi, will say about the state of the regional economy, especially since euro zone inflation fell in July to its lowest level since the height of the financial crisis five years ago.

Earlier today, Lorcan Roche Kelly, one of the most prolific financial-market tweeters who has nearly 14,000 followers, joined us in the forum to give us an idea of what to expect from the ECB and said at most, Draghi will reiterate the central bank’s latest acronyms - TLTRO (Target Long Term Refinancing Operation) and Annual Quarterly Review (AQR) - but is unlikely to spring any new ones on the markets.

from MacroScope:

ECB’s fingers crossed for private loans growth

Mostly bereft of policy options except for outright quantitative easing, European Central Bank President Mario Draghi hopes that hundreds of billions of euros more in cheap loans to banks will boost inflation.

The jury will be out for a long time before we get any decision on whether they have worked.

from MacroScope:

Another month, another downside surprise on euro zone inflation

sale signsNobody except a born pessimist ever expects a bad situation to get incrementally worse.

But the relentless downward trajectory of inflation in the euro zone has got plenty of economists sounding unconvinced that the situation will turn around any time soon.

from Breakingviews:

Don’t believe predictions of low interest rates

By Edward Hadas

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Will the new normal for interest rates be lower than the old? It is rapidly becoming conventional wisdom that years of near-zero overnight rates will be succeeded by an indefinite period in which borrowing costs remain low by the standards of the last few decades. The new consensus is reflected in financial markets: the yield on 30-year U.S. Treasury bonds has fallen from 4 percent to 3.4 percent this year. But it is built on unsound foundations.

from Breakingviews:

French persist in dead-end strong-euro moaning

By Pierre Briançon

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Once again, a senior executive of Airbus  is complaining about the euro’s strength. Fabrice Brégier, the pan-European aircraft maker's current boss, told the Financial Times that the European Central Bank should do something about the “crazy” currency, the strength of which is hurting earnings. A few years ago it was Louis Gallois, then chief executive of Airbus’ parent EADS, who regularly vented his frustration with the central bank. Curiously, those complaints are never heard when Airbus or EADS is headed by a German executive.

from Expert Zone:

Currencies and the collapse of globalisation

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

We live in stirring times. The president of the European Central Bank, Mario Draghi, crossed the monetary policy Rubicon and cut one of the euro area’s key interest rates into negative territory. This is dramatic stuff, as even the most economically oblivious are likely to recognise that negative interest rates are a radical policy.A picture illustration of Euro banknotes and coins taken in central Bosnian town of Zenica

At the same time, the United States Federal Reserve is gracefully gliding out of its quantitative policy position - and by October that money printing process is likely to be effectively at an end. The question from most investors is therefore “what next for U.S. monetary policy?”.

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