from Edward Hadas:

Why Lehman Brothers lives on

By Edward Hadas
May 27, 2015

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from The Great Debate:

Four reasons to raise women’s pay that should make men happy

By Lynn Stuart Parramore
March 5, 2015

To match feature USA-IMMIGRATION/AMERICANAPPAREL

Martha from Mexico works at a sewing machine at the American Apparel factory in downtown Los Angeles, California, October 17, 2008. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

from The Great Debate:

The war between Congress and the White House

By Bill Schneider
February 6, 2015

U.S. Speaker of the House John Boehner watches as U.S. President Barack Obama hosts a bipartisan meeting of Congressional leaders in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington

House Speaker John Boehner watches as President Barack Obama hosts a bipartisan meeting of congressional leaders in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington, January 13, 2015. REUTERS/Larry Downing

from Edward Hadas:

Reducing inequality – where to start?

By Edward Hadas
January 19, 2015

By Edward Hadas

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Edward Hadas:

Dubai the global microcosm

By Edward Hadas
December 19, 2014

By Edward Hadas

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Edward Hadas:

Cultural gloom spawns economic decay

By Edward Hadas
December 4, 2014

By Edward Hadas

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from The Great Debate:

Fed tightening will help stem inequality

By Alexander Friedman
May 12, 2014

The Federal Reserve Building is reflected on a car in Washington September 16, 2008. REUTERS/Jim Young

from Edward Hadas:

Shhh – don’t talk about higher taxes

By Edward Hadas
May 7, 2014

By Edward Hadas

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Edward Hadas:

Wealth buys less lifestyle, more power

By Edward Hadas
April 2, 2014

Many serious people think economic inequality in the United States and other developed economies should be a hot political topic. But the general public hardly cares. There is a bad reason behind lack of public interest.

from The Great Debate:

How do we measure whether Americans are better off than in the past?

By Allison Schrager
January 16, 2014

Are you better off than you were twenty years ago? Probably not relative to very rich people today, but what about relative to you, or to someone your age and position twenty years ago? Income inequality has been called the defining issue of our time. Powerful leaders, from President Obama to Pope Francis, have cited it as evidence that the unfettered capitalism that has enriched the wealthy hasn’t been shared. Of course, there’s a difference between the gains in income being shared evenly, shared a little, or making everyone else poorer. In many ways the average American is much better off than he used to be; in other ways he’s worse off.  But even if we focus on what’s gotten better, we may still need to worry about the future.