Archive

Reuters blog archive

from Breakingviews:

German stocks price in sanctions tail-risk

By Olaf Storbeck

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

The German economic mini-miracle is on hold. Thursday’s announcement of second quarter GDP, which was not affected by Russian trade hostilities, will probably show a decline from the weather-boosted beginning of the year. Investors are looking for worse. The 8.7 percent drop in the DAX stock index since July 3 puts it among the worst performers of major European stock markets.

Russia seems to be the big market worry. But the trade restrictions will only reduce 2014 German GDP growth by 0.2 percentage points, according to Berenberg, which still expects a respectable 1.6 percent annual increase.

Exports to Russia are falling quickly, but that makes little difference to the overall economy. Russia is only the eleventh largest foreign market for Germany, accounting for 3.3 percent of all exports. Besides, the Russian headwinds are not as strong as the tailwinds from other countries. Volkswagen’s first half car sales in the BRIC countries – Brazil, Russia, India and China – increased by 8.1 percent, even though Russia was down 8.4 percent.

from The Great Debate:

Putin’s already paying dearly for Ukraine – and looks willing to sacrifice much more

Russia's President Vladimir Putin chairs a government meeting at the Novo-Ogaryovo state residence outside Moscow

Russian President Vladimir Putin has adopted a “go it alone” approach throughout the Ukraine crisis and regularly describes his country as “independent” and nonaligned. But Moscow is not as isolated as Putin makes out. The fact that he cannot see this reality -- or chooses to ignore it -- has produced a series of decisions that has seriously undermined Russia’s global role.

For the past two decades, Moscow has viewed its foray into global institutions as a major success. It has increasingly integrated into the global economy.  Those achievements, however, now present Putin with a major dilemma.

from Breakingviews:

EU will find Russian sanctions worth the pain

By Pierre Briançon

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. 

It took time for European Union leaders to agree on tough economic sanctions against Russia. The EU is slow. Its members have conflicting interests. Their economies don’t all have the same exposure to Russia. Yet they have finally agreed with the United States on a list of measures to punish Russian banks and oil companies. The already weak EU economy will suffer in return. But over time, Europe will find that the sanctions were worth the pain.

from Breakingviews:

Rob Cox: Solving America’s homegrown Putin dilemma

By Rob Cox
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

As the eagle flies, it's a long way from Bunkerville, Nevada to Slovyansk, Ukraine. Right now, though, the two places have something insidious in common: armed vigilantism. That parallel sadly seems to escape the many American policymakers who have accused President Barack Obama of adopting the logic of appeasement in his dealings with Russian President Vladimir Putin. They're missing a big point. If the United States can't uphold the rule of law at home, it can have no credibility abroad.

from Global Investing:

CORRECTED-Toothless or not, Western sanctions bite Russian bonds

(corrects last paragraph to show that Timchenko was Gunvor's co-founder, not a former CEO)

Western sanctions against Russia lack bite, that's the consensus. Yet the bonds of some Russian companies have taken a hit, especially the ones whose bosses have been targeted for visa- and asset freezes.

  •