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from Hugo Dixon:

Capital markets union needs deregulation

By Hugo Dixon

Hugo Dixon is Editor-at-Large, Reuters News. The opinions expressed are his own.

One of the biggest projects for the next European Commission, which takes office in November, will be to create a “capital markets union.” President-elect Jean-Claude Juncker last week gave Britain’s Jonathan Hill the task of creating such a union “with a view to maximising the benefits of capital markets and non-bank financial institutions for the real economy.”

The prime goal of capital markets union should be to develop healthy sources of non-bank finance that can fund jobs and growth. The European Union suffers from clogged up and fragmented capital markets, which are a fraction of the size of their U.S. equivalents. Changing this is vital because banks, especially in the euro zone periphery, are on the back foot and not able to finance a recovery on their own.

How exactly should this capital union be created? In some cases, no doubt, there will have to be new regulations. One of the ironies of creating any single market – and the capital markets union project can also be viewed as completing Europe’s single market in capital – is that rules have to be passed to break down barriers that balkanise the market.

from Expert Zone:

India Markets Weekahead: Continue pruning your portfolio

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not necessarily those of Thomson Reuters)

Markets began the week on an optimistic note with the Nifty touching a new high of 8,178 but fatigue was noticeable in frontline stocks as action shifted to the mid- and small-caps.

from Expert Zone:

How falling crude prices affect India

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not necessarily those of Thomson Reuters)

Brent crude prices have dropped below $100 a barrel, causing anxiety within the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and giving some relief to India and China. The market is bearish at present but the future is unpredictable.

from MacroScope:

Will the guns fall silent?

A Ukrainian serviceman smokes as he sits on an armoured vehicle near Kramatorsk

Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko and the main pro-Russian rebel leader said they would both order ceasefires on Friday, provided that an agreement is signed on a new peace plan to end the five month war in Ukraine's east.

Talks are due to resume in the Belarussian capital Minsk. On Wednesday, following a string of aggressive statements in previous days, Vladimir Putin put forward a seven-point peace plan, which would end the fighting in Ukraine's east while leaving rebels in control of territory.

from Counterparties:

MORNING BID – Long in the tooth

A frequent refrain among commentators is that this ongoing growth in the stock market has to ‘come to an end’ at some point because of, well, mostly because it’s been going for a while and that it’s gone entirely too far in the last few years.

Given the market’s penchant for 50 percent corrections since the turn of the century, the latter point can’t be discounted entirely, but the former – that essentially, the bull market is endangered because it’s long in the tooth – feels a bit reductive. The day’s figures on car sales due out from the major automakers are likely to support the worries people have about a slowdown that’s just a short drive away from the economy going into a ditch, or something like that (it’s not as if the economy is awesome right now), but the belief in a mid-cycle slowing in some key consumer metrics is probably more the ticket.

from Expert Zone:

Where the growth in Q1 came from

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

GA man walks his cow under high-tension power lines leading from a Tata Power sub station in Mumbai's suburbs February 10, 2013. REUTERS/Vivek Prakash/FilesDP growth of 5.7 percent in the April-June quarter was unexpected in view of the southward drift of India’s economy over the past two years. No wonder it pepped up the Bharatiya Janata Party-led government at a time when the ruling coalition is listing its achievements after 100 days in office. The question is where this growth came from and whether it will be sustained in future.

India’s economy has been slowing after achieving 9 percent growth three years ago. That was because the Congress-led government failed to fuel the economy. The absence of policy reforms, paralytic governance - combined with persistent inflation - discouraged investment. Growth tapered to 4.7 percent last year.

from Expert Zone:

India Markets Weekahead: Time to prune positions in an extended honeymoon

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

The Nifty closed at a new closing high of 7,954 amid volatility in an eventful week that started with the Supreme Court ruling that the allocation of more than 200 coal blocks over the past two decades was illegal.

With nearly 3 trillion rupees at stake, this had a direct effect on the metals and power sector. It also affected banking, which has exposure to the two sectors.

from Breakingviews:

Review: A pained call for radical financial reform

By Edward Hadas

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

Martin Wolf is still recovering from the financial crisis. In his new book, the Financial Times economics commentator admits to being surprised at the depth, breadth and length of the economic malaise which followed the near collapse of the global financial system in 2008.

from Counterparties:

MORNING BID – European Deflation

Never say the Europeans aren’t cautious. The dollar has been on a roll of late, in part because of the market’s growing expectation for more stimulus from the European Central Bank before long that would include some kind of larger-scale quantitative easing program after a speech last week from Mario Draghi that European markets seem to still be reacting to several days later. Reuters, however, reported that the ECB isn’t quite likely to do move quite so fast (heard this one before) and that took some of the wind out of the dollar’s sails and boosted the euro a bit.

Some of the move in the euro will depend on the trend in European yields, where everything is going down – German Bunds continue to make their way rapidly toward zero, and Bund futures remain in an overwhelming bullish trend, per data from Bank of America-Merrill Lynch. Analysts there also anticipate the dollar is going to experience some kind of medium-term correction – but remains in rally mode otherwise. There’s a headwind there for equities from that – rising greenback makes U.S. goods more expensive, but the gains are still only in earlier stages, and haven’t pushed into territory that would otherwise indicate surprising strength that we haven’t seen in some time.

from Breakingviews:

Tragedy may reshape Brazil economy, not just vote

By Martin Hutchinson and Richard Beales

The authors are Breakingviews columnists. All opinions expressed are their own. 

Add Marina Silva to the challenges facing Dilma Rousseff. Brazil’s president faces a new opposition candidate in October’s election after Eduardo Campos’ death in a plane crash, and Silva looks a far bigger threat. If she ousts Rousseff, which polls show is possible, Brazil could gain economically from less state meddling.

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