from Breakingviews:

Ecuador economic ‘miracle’ meets maturity

September 11, 2014

By Rob Cox

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. 

from Global Investing:

Ecuador: a successful emerging market?

June 30, 2014

A colleague of mine, Marius Zaharia (@MZaharia) interviewed Moritz Kraemer, Standard and Poor's head of sovereign ratings for Europe, Middle East and Africa. (you can read the interview here) Kraemer offered this piece of advice to the African governments who are busily tapping bond markets these days:

from Photographers' Blog:

Latitude Zero from underwater

September 3, 2013

Galapagos Islands, Ecuador

By Jorge Silva

Once your eyes go below the ocean waterline, you know that there is an immense parallel universe brimming with images.

from Felix Salmon:

Could Cyprus go the way of Ecuador?

By Felix Salmon
March 29, 2013

A small country which has adopted a major global currency finds itself with massive debts and insolvent banks. Its only real hope is that it controls areas rich in hydrocarbons; the problem is that it has neither the wealth nor the expertise to exploit those hydrocarbons on its own. The result: it ends up essentially selling itself to an omnivorous global superpower which is interested only in access to resources rather than in domestic economic growth and prosperity.

from Alison Frankel:

Truth and justice are elusive in Chevron Ecuador case

By Alison Frankel
January 29, 2013

On Monday, Chevron filed a new motion for summary judgment in its fraud and racketeering case against the lawyers and expert witnesses who helped 47 Ecuadoreans from the Lago Agrio region of the rainforest obtain an $18 billion judgment against the oil company from an Ecuadorean court in 2011. The motion discloses what seems to be incredibly powerful evidence that the Ecuadorean judgment was illegitimate: A onetime presiding judge on the Ecuadorean case, Alberto Guerra, submitted a declaration asserting that he acted as the middleman in setting up a $500,000 bribe from plaintiffs' lawyers to the Ecuadorean judge who entered the judgment against Chevron. Guerra claimed that the plaintiffs actually drafted the 2011 judgment and that he, as a behind-the-scenes ghostwriter, worked with plaintiffs' lawyers to make it seem more like a court ruling. According to his declaration, filed before U.S. District Judge Lewis Kaplan of Manhattan, Guerra had previously received regular payments from the plaintiffs in the Chevron case to ghostwrite other rulings subsequently issued by the presiding judge. And, to boot, Guerra asserted that Chevron -- unlike the plaintiffs -- didn't respond to his solicitation of bribes.

from The Human Impact:

Indigenous women lead land rights struggle in Ecuadorean Amazon

May 26, 2012

When Argentinian oil company CGC began seismic testing on their ancestral land - in one of the most remote and pristine areas of the Ecuadorean Amazon - it was the women of the Sarayaku community who decided to take a stand against Big Oil.

from Alison Frankel:

Chevron tries, tries again to attach Ecuadoreans’ $18 bln award

By Alison Frankel
March 12, 2012

It's been all of three weeks since U.S. District Judge Lewis Kaplan of Manhattan federal court lifted a stay on Chevron's fraud and racketeering suit, which was filed in 2010 against the Ecuadoreans who accuse the oil company of contaminating the Lago Agrio region of the rainforest as well as the Ecuadoreans' lawyers and advisers. But the two sides in this corollary to the endless litigation that produced an $18.2 billion judgment against Chevron in the Ecuadorean courts have picked up as though they never left off. This week Chevron filed a motion for partial summary judgment and renewed its motion for an attachment order that would effectively block the Ecuadoreans from enforcing their award. Lawyers for the RICO defendants, predictably, have responded with accusations of dirty tricks against Chevron and its counsel at Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher.

from Global Investing:

What chances true democracy in oil-rich Iran?

March 2, 2012

Truly, oil can be a curse. Having it may enrich a country (more likely its rulers) but it does not seem condusive to democracy. And the more oil a country produces, the less likely it is to make the transition to democracy, according to research from investment bank Renaisssance Capital.

from Alison Frankel:

Ecuadoreans call for U.S. help in Chevron arbitration

By Alison Frankel
January 30, 2012

In last week's rejection of Chevron's attempt to use U.S. courts to block enforcement of the Lago Agrio plaintiffs' $18 billion Ecuadorean judgment, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit was clearly uneasy at the idea of American judges interfering with foreign jurisprudence. So far, the arbitration panel overseeing Chevron's case against the Republic of Ecuador has had no such qualms. But with Chevron now relying heavily on the arbitration process to protect it from plaintiffs' attempts to claim oil company assets, the panel's power over foreign courts is going to become a key issue -- and the Ecuadorean plaintiffs are now calling for the U.S. government to support Ecuador's sovereignty. Chevron, meanwhile, argues that if anyone has caused harm to Ecuador's constitution, it's the Republic and the Lago Agrio plaintiffs, not Chevron and the arbitration panel.

from Alison Frankel:

Chevron opinion doesn’t go its way

By Alison Frankel
January 27, 2012

If Chevron was still hoping for a ruling from New York's federal courts that would make it impossible for Ecuadorean plaintiffs to collect their $18 billion judgment against the oil company, Thursday's long-awaited opinion by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit puts an end to that strategy. The appellate panel's 30-page opinion -- which explains the court's Sept. 2011 order lifting the worldwide injunction barring enforcement of the Ecuadorean judgment -- gives Chevron the chance to argue once again that the Ecuadoreans can't collect in New York, under the state's Uniform Foreign Country Money-Judgments Recognition Act. But in no uncertain terms, the Second Circuit advised that even if Chevron eventually persuades a New York judge that the Ecuadoreans procured their judgment through fraud, that judge cannot bar enforcement of the judgment outside of the United States.