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from Breakingviews:

Tesco chairman should step aside

By Chris Hughes

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Tesco’s chairman should step aside. Richard Broadbent will struggle to restore market confidence in the troubled UK supermarket group, and to convince investors the board is on top of matters. This week’s accounting scandal has compounded existing concerns about his period at the helm. The priority should be an orderly handover to the right successor as soon as possible.

For a company of Tesco’s size – a market capitalisation of 16 billion pounds – to overstate profit guidance by 250 million pounds is an extremely serious governance failure. The chairman is ultimately accountable, and should show it.

The overstatement may yet turn out to be smaller than initially estimated. Either way, the damage to credibility remains: Tesco’s numbers should be trustworthy.

from Breakingviews:

Inversions start to spin out of control

By Robert Cyran

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. 

Inversions are starting to spin out of control. A quest for tax savings has made digestible overseas targets attractive to U.S. buyers. Hospira’s potential $5 bln deal for a Danone unit highlights a fresh supply, for so-called “spinversions.” The odd combination also reflects the perverse incentives distorting corporate decisions.

from Breakingviews:

Sky Europe transforms BSkyB investment case

By Quentin Webb

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

“British” Sky Broadcasting is no more. The group is buying sister Sky units in Germany and Italy for at least 4.9 billion pounds ($8.3 billion) in cash from Rupert Murdoch’s Twenty-First Century Fox. That transforms the investment case for the UK’s top pay-television group.

from Breakingviews:

Builder’s shaky foundations dent UAE’s credibility

By Una Galani

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

The shaky foundations of the most prominent builder in the United Arab Emirates have dented the country’s credibility. Shares in Dubai-based Arabtec, which helped erect the world’s tallest tower in the emirate, have more than halved since May 15, wiping almost $4.9 billion off its market value. The debacle is a warning to investors attracted by the UAE’s new emerging market status.

from Hugo Dixon:

Six solutions for the UK housing crisis

By Hugo Dixon

Hugo Dixon is Editor-at-Large, Reuters News. The opinions expressed are his own.

Britain’s main economic problem is that the supply of homes isn’t rising nearly as fast as demand. This doesn’t just create the risk of a new housing bubble; young people are finding it increasingly hard to find places to live, especially in crowded London and southeast England. So I make no apologies for returning to the topic after only three weeks.

from Hugo Dixon:

Do national champions merit protection?

By Hugo Dixon

Hugo Dixon is Editor-at-Large, Reuters News. The opinions expressed are his own.

The French always protect their national champions, while the British have a laissez-faire approach to foreign takeovers of their top companies, right? That is certainly the caricature. Witness how France deterred PepsiCo from bidding for Danone in 2005 on the grounds that yoghurt was a strategic industry, while the UK allowed U.S.-based Kraft to move ahead with its hostile bid for Cadbury, the confectioner, in 2010.

from Breakingviews:

ICBC takes slow-burn approach to global expansion

By John Foley

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist.  The opinions expressed are his own.

ICBC’s purchase of Standard Bank’s UK trading division has moved at a glacial pace, and gives rivals little to fear. That’s the best sign that China’s largest lender knows what it’s doing.

from Breakingviews:

Predictions 2014: Reversals and Revivals

By Breakingviews columnists

The authors are Reuters Breakingviews columnists. The opinions expressed are their own.

Breakingviews’ annual compendium of financial foresight sets the agenda for the next 12 months. From Wall Street to the Great Wall, who has most potential to surprise, where are markets heading, and which are the companies to watch? Plus, we predict the winner of soccer’s World Cup.

from Breakingviews:

China is moving closer to its “Dubai moment”

By Peter Thal Larsen

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

China’s reform drive is getting closer to its “Dubai moment”. The emirate’s 2009 refusal to bail out its flagship holding company shocked lenders who had assumed all debt carried an implicit state guarantee. As China introduces market forces to its financial system, it will also have to draw a clearer line between public and private lending.

from Breakingviews:

Banks’ taper rehearsal gives emerging markets hope

By Andy Mukherjee

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

The banking industry’s dress rehearsal for tapering by the Federal Reserve has given emerging markets hope.

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