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from The Great Debate:

Why work with India’s new leader? It’s the economy, stupid

India's Prime Minister Modi gestures while speaking at Madison Square Garden in New York

Great powers sneak up on you.  While Washington has been preoccupied with a burning Middle East, Russia behaving badly and, to a lesser extent, the rise of China, U.S. relations with India have slipped down the diplomatic priority list. In coming decades, however, enormous, unwieldy India will likely be the United States’ most important continental partner in Asia.

On Sunday, 19,000 spectators were enthralled at a rock-star-like rally for India’s new prime minister, Narendra Modi, in Madison Square Garden in New York.  Additional screens were set up in Times Square.  The Rolling Stones and U2 do not command a similar reception. Responding to chants of “Modi, Modi, Modi,” the prime minister promised to “form the India of [his fans’] dreams.”

Modi, a Hindu nationalist who successfully brought economic growth to his home state of Gujarat, was elected by a landslide in May. His first state visit to the United States this week signified to Indians around the world that their country is back, front and center, on the world stage. After a frustrating few years of economic slowdown and gridlock in Delhi, they can be proud to be Indian again. Their hopes are now pinned on their new prime minister and his team.

Let’s hope that India is back on the U.S. priority list as well.

India's Prime Minster Modi appears on screen as he speaks on stage during the Global Citizen Festival concert in Central Park in New YorkWhy does India matter? First, it is enormous and growing. Just 16 years from now, many experts believe, India will likely have inched past China to become the world’s most populous country, with 1.5 billion people. By 2030, China will likely be the world’s largest economy by purchasing-power parity, with the United States second and India third.

from Breakingviews:

How Big Oil could grease invisible hand

By Stephanie Rogan

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

The U.S. energy problem is very much due to a breakdown of the free market, contends the new documentary, “Pump.” Married co-directors Josh Tickell and Rebecca Harrell Tickell show how Big Oil’s monopoly on transportation fuels hurts Americans more than they realize. If drivers had options when filling up their tanks, both country and consumers would benefit.

from Breakingviews:

Double-digit oil promises lubrication not seizure

By Ian Campbell

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Double-digit oil is a welcome sign, not a harbinger of deflationary doom. The decline of the price of a barrel of Brent crude to just below $100, down 13 percent from its June peak, is good disinflation. It will help consumer spending and global economic recovery.

from Hugo Dixon:

Gas and bank security have similarities

Europe is currently conducting two stress tests. One is on its energy suppliers, to see how badly they would fare if Russian gas was disrupted. The other is on euro zone banks, to ensure they are strong enough to finance economic recovery.

It is hard to know which of the two is the more important. But it is clear that an effective regime for energy security requires many of the same elements as financial stability.

from Breakingviews:

Scottish secessionists in bind over North Sea oil

By Fiona Maharg-Bravo

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

How much oil is left in the North Sea? The question is playing a key role in the debate over Scottish independence, since most of the bounty would probably remain in Scotland, and would make up around 15 percent of national output. But the real question isn’t just how much is left, but what politicians can do to get it out of the ground.

from Breakingviews:

Tragedy may reshape Brazil economy, not just vote

By Martin Hutchinson and Richard Beales

The authors are Breakingviews columnists. All opinions expressed are their own. 

Add Marina Silva to the challenges facing Dilma Rousseff. Brazil’s president faces a new opposition candidate in October’s election after Eduardo Campos’ death in a plane crash, and Silva looks a far bigger threat. If she ousts Rousseff, which polls show is possible, Brazil could gain economically from less state meddling.

from Breakingviews:

Dynegy’s $6.25 bln grab marks return of ambition

By Christopher Swann

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. 

Dynegy only got out of bankruptcy two years ago. Now two deals worth $6.25 billion, announced on Friday, mark a return of ambition for the U.S. power company. It once tried to buy Enron and eventually went bust after a spat involving activist Carl Icahn. The purchases look sensible, but the lesson from Dynegy’s past is to avoid getting carried away.

from Global Markets Forum Dashboard:

U.S. shale revolution continues to upend geopolitics

Dominick Chirichella, president, Energy Management Institute

Dominick Chirichella, president, Energy Management Institute

Oil traders who bet on rising prices were hit with a double whammy on Tuesday in the way of announcements from the top two energy data agencies. The still-nascent U.S. shale energy revolution is upending eons-old geopolitical events and it still seems to be in the early days.

Global energy watchdog the International Energy Agency revised lower its outlook for oil demand this year back to 2012 levels as the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) said July U.S. oil production rose to its highest in more than a quarter century.

from Breakingviews:

REITs and MLPs make tax inversions a diversion

By Christopher Swann

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

A couple of U.S. home-grown tax breaks are making M&A inversions look like a diversion. American authorities are letting Windstream designate its telecom cables as real estate, qualifying them for tax breaks. And a partnership will shield assets of energy firm Hess from the Internal Revenue Service. Politicians, though, are indignant over firms that move overseas – even when home-grown tax loopholes are costlier.

from Breakingviews:

Argentine opportunity cost is reason to cut deal

By Martin Hutchinson

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Argentina’s debt negotiators need to think about opportunity cost. A failure to reach agreement with holdout creditors by Wednesday might not make things immediately worse. But it would set back recent efforts to curry favor with international financiers – efforts that could pay off richly for the Argentine economy.

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