from Reihan Salam:

Technology, not regulation, is the best way to tackle climate change

By Reihan Salam
June 6, 2014

 warming111

By all accounts, President Obama is deeply interested in his legacy. And though relatively few American voters see dealing with climate change as a top priority for the federal government, the president famously sees it as the most important issue he can address in his second term. Having failed to shepherd climate change legislation through Congress in 2009, when Democrats had large majorities in the Senate and the House, the Obama administration has shifted to using new regulations to achieve its environmental policy goals. This week, the Environmental Protection Agency introduced its Clean Power Plant Proposed Rule, a sweeping initiative that aims to reduce carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants.

from The Great Debate:

Antisocial genesis of the social cost of carbon

By Susan E. Dudley, Brian F. Manix and Sofie E. Miller
October 10, 2013

The day after his 2009 inauguration, President Barack Obama committed to “creating an unprecedented level of openness in government.”

from The Great Debate:

Public backs Obama on strong carbon controls

By Andrew Baumann
June 25, 2013

Southern Company's Plant Bowen in Cartersville, Georgia, in an aerial file photograph, Sept. 4, 2007. REUTERS/Chris Baltimore

from The Great Debate:

Obama’s worthy EPA nominee deserves support

By Stephen Harper
April 9, 2013

The era of “simple” environmental problems is over. Today the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state regulators face issues, like climate change, that are complex from all angles: scientific, economic and political. At the same time, some of the EPA’s regulatory tools—like the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), a law that was crafted decades ago—are cumbersome or inadequate. And there is virtually no chance that our gridlocked Congress will come to the rescue and agree on how to modernize reforms.

from The Great Debate:

The best solution for climate change is a carbon tax

By Ralph Nader
January 4, 2013

With Lisa Jackson, the head of the Environmental Protection Agency, stepping down, President Barack Obama is losing one of the few people left in Washington who was willing to speak up about global warming and to push for significant measures to curb its impact. During her tenure, Ms. Jackson was frequently denounced by GOP members of Congress and all too often reined in by Obama. Despite his and Congress’ failure to pass legislation addressing global warming, Ms. Jackson advanced a regulatory agenda to pick up some of the slack.

from Environment Forum:

Thank you, EPA: U.S. solar companies

December 8, 2009

tomwernerMany businesses chafed on Monday at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's declaration that greenhouse gas emissions endanger human health.

from Financial Regulatory Forum:

US EPA moves on emissions as Congress stalls

By Reuters Staff
December 7, 2009

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Director Lisa Jackson announces a new Obama administration position that greenhouse gasses are a threat to public health at the EPA in Washington, December 7, 2009. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst  By Timothy Gardner

WASHINGTON, Dec 7 (Reuters) - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Monday cleared the way for regulation of greenhouse gases without new laws passed by Congress, reflecting President Barack Obama's commitment to act on climate change as a major summit opened in Copenhagen. 

from James Pethokoukis:

EPA carbon ruling creates an even bigger ‘uncertainty tax’ for business

December 7, 2009

Call it the Uncertainty Tax. I mean, it is not enough that the American private sector has to deal with the mercurial state of healthcare, financial and tax reform, now it has to calculate the likelihood and impact of  the Obama administration unilaterally imposing draconian carbon rules? Even the EPA calls such efforts inefficient and economically disruptive. A few other thoughts:

from The Great Debate:

U.S. environmental agency walks a tightrope on CO2

April 20, 2009

John Kemp Great DebateThe Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)'s proposed findings on greenhouse gas emissions were a carefully worded attempt to appease climate-change activists while containing hostility from business and energy organizations or Congress.