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from Nicholas Wapshott:

VA scandal is no mark against big government

U.S. military veterans listen in the audience during a House Veterans' Affairs Committee hearing on the Phoenix VA Health Care System wait list, on Capitol Hill in Washington

For some, the veterans hospitals scandal is a human tragedy pure and simple. Those who loyally served their nation in uniform, putting their lives on the line, were shunned when they sought medical help.

For others, however, the troubles at the Department of Veterans Affairs have provided what one pundit called “A gift from God.”

For those commentators, the scandal confirmed their worst fears. The logic runs like this: The VA provides a government-run health service; the failures of the VA are a disgrace; ipso facto, all government-run health systems are a disgrace; proving that all government-run bodies are a disgrace. So all government should be sharply reduced -- if not abandoned altogether.

Vietnam veteran Downs gives a thumbs up during a demonstration of modular prosthetic arm technology developed by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency at the Pentagon in WashingtonThe VA troubles, however, prove no such thing. The poor treatment of veterans has nothing to do with funding and everything to do with administrative incompetence combined with craven deceit.

from The Great Debate:

To help injured veterans, bring in private sector help

VA BACKLOG

In all the brouhaha about the Veterans Administration -- the alleged misconduct and malpractice in Arizona, and the ensuing calls for the head of Secretary Eric Shinseki -- it is crucial that the issue not be treated solely as a referendum on Shinseki, and on the Obama administration generally.

The VA system is far too reluctant to ask for help from the private sector in caring for the hundreds of thousands suffering from the signature injuries of 21st century war: post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI).

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