from MacroScope:

Davos Day Two — Rouhani, Lew and Lagarde

By Mike Peacock
January 23, 2014

Day one in Davos showed the masters of the universe fretting about Sino-Japanese military tensions, the treacherous investment territory in some emerging markets and the risk of a lurch to the right in Europe at May’s parliamentary elections which could make reform of the bloc even harder.

from Global Investing:

A (costly) balancing act in Hungary

February 14, 2013

A bond trader in London is still marvelling at the market's willingness to snap up a Eurobond from Hungary, calling it a country with "a policy mix so unorthodox even Aunty Christine won't lend to them".  But Hungary's probable glee at bypassing the IMF and "Aunty Christine"  with $3.25 billion in two bonds that were almost four times oversubscribed, is probably short-sighted.

from Global Investing:

Hungary’s plan to get some cash in the bank

March 23, 2012

Hungary says it might borrow money from global bond markets before it lands a long-awaited aid deal with the International Monetary Fund. That pretty much seems to suggest Budapest has given up hope of getting the IMF cash any time soon. Given the fund has already said it won't visit Hungary in April, that view would seem correct.

from Global Investing:

Emerging bonds: crawling out of the woodwork

May 12, 2010

Now that markets appear to have decided that a $1 trillion stabilisation package from the European Union is enough to soothe global nerves and ward off a sovereign debt crisis, emerging market sovereigns and corporates may start to issue bonds again.

from Commentaries:

Ukraine’s Naftogaz leaves Eurobond holders with little choice

October 1, 2009

UKRAINE-RUSSIA/NAFTOGAZThe repayment date for Ukrainian state energy group Naftogaz's $500 million Eurobond came and went on Wednesday, but all bondholders got was a coupon payment.

from The Great Debate UK:

Bonds steal thunder from loans in Europe

By Alexander Smith
May 19, 2009

alex-smith- Alexander Smith is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. -

When the going got tough, banks were quick to bring down the shutters and cut off loans to European companies, forcing them to seek other sources of funding. The result -- a dramatic shift to the bond markets, where corporates borrow directly from investors.