from MacroScope:

Brazil’s capital controls and the law of unintended consequences

June 5, 2013

Brazilian economic policy is fast becoming a shining example of the law of unintended consequences. As activity fades and inflation picks up, the government has tried several different measures to fix the economy - and almost every time, it ended up creating surprise side-effects that made matters worse. Controls on gasoline prices tamed inflation, but opened a hole in the trade balance. Efforts to reduce electricity fares ended up curbing, not boosting, investment plans.

from Expert Zone:

Will the rupee fall further?

June 3, 2013

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

On May 31, the rupee fell to an 11-month low of 56.51 to the dollar. It wasn’t the only currency to suffer a loss. Most currencies depreciated during the month; some more than the others.

from MacroScope:

Brazil: Something’s got to give

February 7, 2013

How about living in a fast-growing economy with tame inflation, record-low interest rates, stable exchange rate and shrinking public debt. Sounds like paradise, doesn't it? But Brazil may be starting to realize that this is also impossible.

from Global Investing:

A yen for emerging markets

January 4, 2013

Global Investing has written several times about Japanese mom-and-pop investors'  adventures in emerging markets. Most recently, we discussed how the new government's plan to prod the Bank of Japan into unlimited monetary easing could turn more Japanese into intrepid yield hunters.  Here's an update.

from Global Investing:

Is the rouble overhyped?

October 4, 2012

For many months now the Russian rouble has been everyone's favourite currency. Thanks to all the interest it rose 4 percent against the dollar during the July-September quarter. How long can the love affair last?

from Global Investing:

India rate cut clamour misses rupee’s fall-JPM

June 6, 2012

Indian markets are rallying this week as they price in an interest rate cut at the Reserve Bank's June 18 meeting.  With the country still in shock after last week's 5.3 percent first quarter GDP growth print, it is easy to understand the clamour for rate cuts. After all, first quarter growth just a year ago was 9.2 percent.

from Global Investing:

Turkey gearing up for rate cuts but not today

February 21, 2012

Could the Turkish central bank surprise markets again today?

Given its track record, few will dare to place firm bets on the outcome of today's meeting but the general reckoning for now is that the bank will keep borrowing and lending rates steady and signal no immediate change to its weekly repo rate of 5.75 percent. With year-on-year inflation in the double digits, logic would dictate there is no scope for an easier monetary policy.

from Global Investing:

Euro periphery: Lehman-type shock still on cards

February 13, 2012

The passing of Greek austerity measures is fuelling a rally in peripheral debt today with Italian, Spanish and Portuguese yields falling across the curve.

from MacroScope:

Will U.S. criticism affect Japan’s FX stance?

December 28, 2011

Currency analysts are divided over whether U.S. criticism of Japan's forex policy will change Tokyo's currency stance. While some say it could raise the hurdle for further Japanese intervention, others think it might not have much impact. Rob Ryan, FX strategist at BNP Paribas in Singapore says the effect will be limited given uncertainty about the Japanese economy's outlook and current levels of dollar/yen and cross/yen pairs.