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from Anatole Kaletsky:

Behind Wall Street’s anxiety

The recent economic news has been about as investor-friendly as anyone could imagine.

It started with last week’s strong U.S. employment figures; continued through Tuesday’s reassuring International Monetary Fund forecasts, which put the probability of avoiding a global recession this year to 99.9 percent, and culminated in dovish Federal Reserve minutes, which soothed concerns about an earlier than expected  increase in U.S. interest rates.

Considering all this good news, investors could justifiably feel surprised -- even shocked -- by Wall Street’s sharp falls this week. By Thursday afternoon, the Standard & Poor’s 500 had given back its entire gain for the year, and the Nasdaq 100 gauge of leading technology stocks had suffered its biggest setback since 2011. Many market analysts interpreted the negative reaction to good news as a classic sign of a market top, warning that the uninterrupted rise in share prices that began more than five years ago is overdue for a sharp reversal.

But looking at the economic and financial data, it was hard to see justification for such anxiety. Last week’s rebound in U.S. employment growth -- the crucial monthly statistic that tends to set the tone for asset markets around the world -- could only be interpreted as good news. Especially after the shockingly weak December payrolls that triggered the global equity correction at the start of the year.

from Counterparties:

MORNING BID – Dot Matrix

The Federal Reserve did it again, giving back to the markets at a time when it wasn't expected, and showing once again that the early months of a new Fed chair's tenure are fraught ones, in terms of interpreting monetary policy.

Janet Yellen probably didn't mean to suggest rate hikes could come as soon as six months after the bond-buying program ends for good. And the release of the Fed minutes also demonstrated that the Fed - even in discussing projections - worried about how it would all look, specifically the "dot matrix" that showed several Fed members saw higher rates before long, and really, that it was all just kind of overstated. (Yellen even said this at her press conference - that the dots did not mean what you thought they meant).

from Counterparties:

MORNING BID – The same-store situation

Same-store sales figures may be enough to inspire some investors to resume paring portfolios of some consumer discretionary stocks that have underperformed in the last five or six weeks.

Equities rebounded on Tuesday, but the overall feeling is that the market hasn’t yet finished with the bout of selling infecting the high-volatility, high-beta names that dominate conversations.
Most consumer names aren’t in this rarefied air (they don’t trade at price-to-sales ratios of a gajillion) but they’ve still been a target for some time on bad news.

from The Great Debate:

Stress and the Citi

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Markets are still absorbing the Federal Reserve’s surprising smack-down of Citigroup. Under its chief executive officer, Michael Corbat, Citi had greatly strengthened its capital base -- indeed, it had one of the best capital ratios of all the big banks -- and had proposed modest dividend increases and stock buybacks.  Instead, City was the only big American bank that failed its review.

The Fed announcement, perhaps harking back to the Alan Greenspan tradition, was gnomic, to say the least. The Citi bombshell was buried in a few lines in both the press release and the much longer official statement.

from Expert Zone:

India Market Weekahead: Ride the election rally with some caution

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(Any opinions expressed here are not those of Thomson Reuters)

The Nifty touched a high of 6758 during the week, part of a market rally for 10 consecutive sessions - the longest streak in five years.‎ An overdue correction set in towards the end of the week with the Nifty ending flat at 6694.

Advance-decline data suggests that interest is shifting to the small and mid-cap space where advances outpaced declines. Although we are touching new highs, the missing euphoria indicates investor caution  that is good for the health of the market.

from Breakingviews:

Central bankers live in silent fear

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By Edward Hadas

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

It’s scary to think what higher policy interest rates might do to a financial system habituated to virtually free money. Central bankers, though, profess not to be too worried about this risk. They are either overconfident - or living in silent fear.

from Counterparties:

MORNING BID – $4 trillion, through the eye of a needle

The shift in the stock market away from momentum names and toward value is encouraging at least in some sense because it points to an ongoing appetite for equities rather than a reduction in interest there. However, one has to add the caveat that the Federal Reserve is still very much a part of this market, even as it diminishes its footprint.

The $55 billion in bond buying per month definitely continues to underpin rates and keep funding costs low for companies. Still, the market has reduced its reliance on the central bank and yet bond yields continue to sink, at least in the long-dated part of the curve, where the 30-year note neared 3.50 percent and the 10-year came close to 2.60 percent yet again.

from Expert Zone:

India Markets Weekahead: ‎Ride the election rally but skim the profits

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(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

The market began the week on a high note after an extended weekend but could not sustain the rally due to profit booking. The Nifty was at a high of 6570 on Tuesday but the rest of the trading days remained lackluster and it ended the week with a marginal loss - at 6495 after the extended trading session on Saturday.

Although the week was marked with heightened political activity as candidates for the general election were announced, the U.S Federal Reserve had a sobering effect on the markets. The Fed decision to continue with further tapering of $10 billion and focus on interest rates, which should start rising sooner than expected, saw corrections in most markets as the dollar strengthened.

from Counterparties:

MORNING BID – Hi Janet, Here’s a Selloff.

Welcome Madame Chair, here's a market selloff for you.

Fed Chair Janet Yellen made some news that she didn't expect yesterday. She perhaps thought she was offering some clarity when she answered the question from Reuters' Ann Saphir as to when the Fed might start raising interest rates. That's not how it worked, although at least in this case she didn't mouth off to Maria Bartiromo the way Ben Bernanke did eight years ago.

What we didn't see in her answer on the distance between the end of QE3 and the first rate hikes of "six months" (or something like that), is whether we will start to see any kind of reaction from the primary dealers surveyed by Reuters yesterday.

from Global Investing:

And best central banking twitter of the year goes to…

Congratulations to Bank of Spain, which won the best central bank website of the year award given by Central Banking Publications, as the specialist news provider for central bankers hosted its inaugural central banking awards  last night in London. (The flagship Central Banker of the Year award was won by ECB's Draghi, no surprise there)

Central banks around the world are looking for ways to improve their communication strategies and the website is one area they are focusing on (Quantity is not everything, yet the Bank of Spain's website features 7,000 pages of information and 24,700 separate files).

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