from Breakingviews:

Wells Fargo: first big bank simple enough to fail

November 26, 2014

By Daniel Indiviglio

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. 

from MacroScope:

Housing markets in U.S., UK, Canada set to cool even if rates stay low for longer

November 25, 2014

AEven as the expected date for an eventual interest rate rise in the U.S., Britain and Canada keeps getting pushed further into the future, the outlook for residential housing markets in these countries is also starting to cool.

from Morning Bid with David Gaffen:

As shaky as a fiddler on the roof

November 19, 2014

It’s nice to look back every month or so and see just how far the market has come, and, well, it’s come a long way. And it's worth noting yet again that investors are starting to talk about corrections.

from MacroScope:

A Bank of England dovecote?

By Mike Peacock
November 12, 2014

Bank of England Governor and Financial Stability Board (FSB) Chairman Mark Carney arrives for a news conference at the Bank for International Settlements (BIS) in Basel

The Bank of England will produce its quarterly inflation report today. With wage growth still notable by its absence and inflation dropping to just 1.2 percent in September, noises from within the BoE suggest the timing of a first interest rate rise is heading further over the horizon.

from Anatole Kaletsky:

Why political gridlock works for the U.S. economy, but not for Japan or EU

By Anatole Kaletsky
November 7, 2014

U.S. President Obama hosts a luncheon for bi-partisan Congressional leaders in the Old Family Dining Room at the White House in Washington

Is gridlocked government a betrayal of democracy? Or does it allow citizens to get on with their lives and businesses, unencumbered by meddlesome politicians?

from MacroScope:

Central banking elite under one roof

By Mike Peacock
November 7, 2014

U.S. Federal Reserve Chair Yellen speaks with European Central Bank President Draghi at the Jackson Hole Economic Policy Symposium in Jackson Hole

After European Central Bank chief Mario Draghi managed to mend fences and get his colleagues to sign up to his 1 trillion euros or so target to push into the ailing euro zone economy, Paris hosts its version of the Jackson Hole central bankers meeting.

from Breakingviews:

End of U.S. QE is actually good for world economy

November 4, 2014

By Ian Campbell

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Morning Bid with David Gaffen:

We come to praise QE, not to bury it

October 29, 2014

So, that’s it. Seven years and $4.4 trillion later, the U.S. Federal Reserve will exit quantitative easing, despite what a few Fedsters have said about the possibility of QE4. Let’s remember that third sequels rarely, if ever, are satisfying, they tend to meet with shrugs from audiences, and don’t often include the original cast of characters. "Alien Resurrection" ring a bell? That’s what QE4 would be. But I digress.

from Global Investing:

Strong dollar, weak oil and emerging markets growth

October 17, 2014

Many emerging economies have been banking on weaker currencies to revitalise economic growth.  Oil's 25 percent fall in dollar terms this year should also help. The problem however is the dollar's strength which is leading to a general tightening of monetary conditions worldwide, more so in countries where central banks are intervening to prevent their currencies from falling too much.

from Morning Bid with David Gaffen:

Ebola and market pressures

October 16, 2014

There’s a glut of various stresses operating in the markets right now: Europe’s inability to get out of its own way, the sharp fall in oil prices that probably says more about supply issues and lackluster demand in Asian markets than the United States, the uncertain path of the Federal Reserve and a nagging concern that weak inflation figures show the economy really isn’t healing all that much.