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from Counterparties:

MORNING BID – Apres Fed, le Deluge

The Kremlinologists turned out to be right, and the Federal Reserve left its "considerable time" language in its statement to assure the markets that it would be around for a while longer with rock bottom rates. It's the divergent (to a point) reaction out of the markets themselves that is interesting to parse, and will be key to watch in coming weeks and months. The action in the stock market was to suggest the entire exercise was a snooze-fest, with stocks ending marginally higher (yes, the Dow at a new record) but not too far from where the major averages were trading just before the news. Which is to say the equity market, always the most optimistic of U.S. markets, has it in mind that low rates stay for now, and until "now" is "then," it's time to party.

Bond markets, inflation-protected securities and the currency markets saw things differently, and it's those markets that may be more instructive to watch as the days and months go on and on. The five-year TIPS note saw its yield break above zero for the first time in ages, a sign that investors are starting to worry more about inflation, or higher Fed rates, which is interesting as consumer price data showed year-over-year inflation fall to a 1.7 percent rate earlier in the day. The dollar put together another strong rally, meanwhile, with the dollar index hitting highs not seen in 14 months and big rises against its main companions, the euro and the yen. And this is where the dot matrix comes in.

The dots, of course, are not an array of Janet Yellen's prowess (or lack thereof) at the firing range, but the expectation from Fed officials on where they see rates in coming years. With 2017's dots all suggesting rates at greater than 3 percent - and closer to 4 percent - the currency market has taken the hawkish outlook here, as Jens Nordvig, strategist at Nomura, said in an email to Reuters. There were two dissenters - the usual suspects, Charles Plosser of Philly and Richard Fisher of Dallas - who were not thrilled to see the statement so dovish, and so Nordvig takes all this and says that this should be "enough to sustain USD uptrend vs G10" currencies, so, against the yen, euro, Swiss franc, pound and all the others.

He does warn, however, that the kind of uncertainty that would drive significant outperformance against the emerging markets currencies is not yet present, given rates are going to be low for some time, so that firm is closing some call options outstanding against the peso and ringgit while sticking with long bets against the yen and euro. "It will also soon be time to ask new questions on the Dollar. What will be the pace of tightening the US economy can cope with? What is the strength of capital flows into the US? Answers to these questions will determine whether the relatively sharp Dollar move in the last 2-3 months can be extrapolated over the next 3-6 months," he wrote in late commentary Wednesday. There's also the possibility, of course, that markets overreacted to the Fed - another soft jobs report would undo a lot of the recent gains in the dollar, or even a couple of other second-tier indicators reinforcing the notion that the outlook from individual Fed members on rates is just that - an outlook - and as a result cannot be trusted insomuch as the data will tell them what to do, dots and dollar strength and models be damned.

from Counterparties:

MORNING BID — Breaking it down, Fed style

It's all over but the dissection of the Fed statement, due later today, which will follow with a Janet Yellen press conference after the U.S. markets get word of whether the Fed did or did not eliminate the "considerable time" bit from its statement that saw markets go into a tizzy all of Tuesday. At this point the market believes that phrase now may *not* be eliminated, which marks the second reversal in about a week on this point. No matter what, somebody is going to be caught leaning in the wrong direction, but if the latest intelligence is that the Fed's statement won't change materially until the October meeting, then the freshest bets are probably in the direction of those betting on that much. So if the statement does cut out that language or modifies it in any way, you could see a selloff in equities, the dollar and bonds.

The meeting also brings with it the update on the Fed's "central tendencies," that is, its sure-to-be-incorrect projections on where the economy is going. Given the rebound in the second quarter that seems to have at least been somewhat sustained in the third quarter, it wouldn't be surprising to see the Fed outlook for GDP bumped up for 2014 (currently 2.1 to 2.3 pct) and 2015 (at 3.0 to 3.2 pct - the Fed will predict 3 percent growth for the year-out period until we're all Morlocks), and the unemployment rate expectations are projected to drop to maybe 5.7 to 5.8 percent from the current 6 to 6.1 percent expected at year-end. Which is all well and good, but it doesn't give us a good sense, really, of what's to happen going past the meeting.

from MacroScope:

The final lap

A "Yes" campaign poster is displayed on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides

Three opinion polls last night all put Scotland’s anti-independence vote at 52 percent, the secession campaign on 48. If accurate, the “Yes” camp will have to move heaven and earth in the next 24 hours to turn the tables despite having dramatically narrowed the gap.

The towering caveat is that no one knows if the polls are accurate and if not, in which direction they have got it wrong. The latest trio showed between 8 and 14 percent of Scotland's 4.3 million voters at least say they are still undecided.

from MacroScope:

A Fed dove does Broadway

Earlier this month, the chief of the Minneapolis Fed gave an extraordinary speech http://bit.ly/1qUTucn in which he called for higher inflation.

That's right -- you and me, paying more for goods and services. Why would a central banker want something like that?

from Ann Saphir:

Fed’s Kocherlakota does Broadway

Earlier this month, the chief of the Minneapolis Fed gave an extraordinary speech http://bit.ly/1qUTucn in which he called for higher inflation.

That's right -- you and me, paying more for goods and services. Why would a central banker want something like that?

from Ann Saphir:

A Fed dove does Broadway

Earlier this month, the chief of the Minneapolis Fed gave an extraordinary speech http://bit.ly/1qUTucn in which he called for higher inflation.

That's right -- you and me, paying more for goods and services. Why would a central banker want something like that?

from Anatole Kaletsky:

Here’s what it will take to trigger the next stock market correction

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange shortly after the market's opening in New York

As Wall Street hit another new record Thursday, it is worth considering what could cause a serious setback in stock market prices around the world. Since I started writing this column in 2012, I have repeatedly argued that the rebound in stock market prices from their nadir in the 2008-09 global financial crisis was turning into a structural bull market that could continue into the next decade.

Asset prices, however, never move in a straight line. It has been more than two years without even a 10 percent correction and five years without a 20 percent setback. This cannot go on.

from Breakingviews:

German yield curve is the safest one to play

By Swaha Pattanaik

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

 Bull flattening may sound like an exotic, and rather cruel, sport, but for today’s bond investor, it describes an investment opportunity. Some juicy bear flattening is also available, although it comes with somewhat more risk.

from Counterparties:

MORNING BID – Down in the Jackson Hole

The markets ease into a traditionally slow period with not much to look forward to other than the Federal Reserve’s Jackson Hole conference due next week, where the highlight, naturally, will be anything Janet Yellen says regarding the state of the labor markets. The chances of the Fed signaling a new shift when it comes to policy are slim – Yellen has proved to be a cautious speaker thus far, interested in furthering Ben Bernanke’s way of telegraphing as much as possible when it comes to policy alterations, and Yellen is more so, her “six months” comment from a few months ago notwithstanding. As Jonathan Spicer and Howard Schneider reported a few days ago, Yellen is much more interested in fighting an inflation war than dealing with a persistent deflationary/lousy economic environment to dominate the headlines, so the expectation should be for lower rates for longer, and not to expect a lot of surprises out of Wyoming next week.

Goldman Sachs economists not that Yellen had sounded a bit more positive on the labor market in July, but even still their belief when it comes to the slack that exists in the jobs market is still too great to bear much more than the end of quantitative easing/bond buying and perhaps a move to a couple of small rate increases around the middle of next year that, well, won’t hurt too much given the Fed’s policy rate still sits between 0 and 25 basis points. The forecasts from Reuters most recently put the first rate hike somewhere in the April to June range, which fluctuates depending on the strength of the economic figures.

from The Great Debate:

Are too-big-to-fail banks being cut down to size?

Financial institution representatives are sworn in before testifying at the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington

The massive $16-billion mortgage fraud settlement agreement just reached by Bank of America and federal authorities -- only the latest in a string of such settlements -- makes it easy to lose sight of what good shape banks are in.

Banks are now far better capitalized, with tighter credit processes and better risk accounting. The bigger Wall Street houses have also jettisoned many of their most volatile trading operations. Yet most have still managed to turn in decent earnings. That is a tribute to the steady and generally thoughtful imposition of the new Dodd-Frank and Basel III regulations, the rules on “stress-testing” balance sheets and the controversial Volcker Rule that limits speculative proprietary trading operations.

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