from Chrystia Freeland:

Why are people leaning on “Lean In”?

By Chrystia Freeland
March 14, 2013

"Man is defined as a human being and woman is defined as a female. Whenever she tries to behave as a human being she is accused of trying to emulate the male." That observation by Simone de Beauvoir helped to inspire the feminist revolution after World War Two. Two generations later, Sheryl K. Sandberg has written a book, "Lean In," arguing that is still the case today.

from Events:

Girls just wanna have fundamental representation in government

March 7, 2013

Co-authored by Clare Richardson.

PHOTO: An Afghan parliament member (L) votes on a list of cabinet nominees at the parliament house in Kabul, January 16, 2010. REUTERS/Ahmad Masood

from The Human Impact:

Feminism alive and kicking in Germany as #aufschrei campaign makes waves

January 29, 2013

A boss who offers a female employee to work sitting on his lap because there is no desk available for her;  a guest who tells the waitress he wants to eat "pussy" when she asks him what he'd like to order; a man who wonders why a woman works in computing even though “she is pretty”.

from John Lloyd:

India tries to move beyond its rape culture

By John Lloyd
December 28, 2012

In 1992 a young woman, Bhanwari Devi, was allegedly gang-raped near her village of Bhateri, some 40 miles from Jaipur, capital of the Indian state of Rajasthan. The incident has to be couched in “allegedly” and “reportedly” because – though the fact of the matter has been widely accepted, with compensation being paid to Devi by the state government – the five men accused were acquitted, and an appeal against the acquittal is still – 20 years after – pending.

from John Lloyd:

A church divided against itself cannot stand

By John Lloyd
November 27, 2012

The Church of England voted not to ordain female bishops last week, a move widely seen as defying the modern world. Much justification was given for this view.

from India Insight:

Civics clashes with religion as women face bans from some Indian shrines

November 6, 2012

(The opinions expressed are the author's own, and may not necessarily reflect those of Thomson Reuters)

from India Insight:

Women fast for their men on Karva chauth, but why?

November 4, 2012

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author. They are not necessarily those of Thomson Reuters)

from John Lloyd:

The endangered lifestyle of the rich and famous alpha male

By John Lloyd
October 16, 2012

Mark Anthony, in his oration for the murdered Julius Caesar in Shakespeare’s play, observes: “The evil that men do lives after them.” Indeed, in our supercharged world, evil lives with its perpetrator, tearing him down while still in his prime. Anthony’s musing would bring a grim smile to the faces of many men; none grimmer, perhaps, than that of Dominique Strauss-Kahn, former head of the International Monetary Fund, former presidential hope of France’s Socialist Party, and – given the success that the more modest Francois Hollande had in beating Nicolas Sarkozy  – a former future president of France.

from Tales from the Trail:

Santorum staffer questions whether God wants women presidents

January 18, 2012

A staffer in Rick Santorum's presidential campaign is under fire for an email suggesting a female commander-in-chief could be at odds with the Bible's teachings.

from The Great Debate:

Michele Bachmann’s glass house

By Amanda Marcotte
January 4, 2012

By Amanda Marcotte
The views expressed are her own.

Of all the candidates who rose and fell during the prolonged Republican primary campaign going into Iowa, Michele Bachmann took the wildest ride. Bachmann won the 2011 Ames Straw Poll in August, taking 28 percent of the vote, mainly due to conservative evangelicals who supported her strong anti-abortion views and her ease in speaking Christianese. But a mere five months later, after a disastrous showing in Iowa where she only took 5 percent of the vote, Bachmann is dropping out of the race.