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from Edward Hadas:

Call that money-printing?

By Edward Hadas

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Finance doesn’t get the disrespect it deserves. Nothing about money and credit is sacred – certainly not quantity of currency outstanding. The political and monetary authorities should feel free to add and subtract money as needed to help the economy function better.

Consider the current oversupply of debt. Loans can be a very helpful financial tool. But right now, the tool is malfunctioning. The vast quantities of debt sloshing around the global financial system have brought much of the developed world into a sort of financial gridlock. Companies and households restrain their hiring and spending because they feel financially insecure. Governments are reluctant to borrow more because their balance sheets are stretched.

The result: people are unnecessarily and undesirably unemployed, useful investments are not made, and consumption is pointlessly restrained. The efforts to push up economic activity generally involve adding more debt. The financial overhang is not the only weakness in developed economies, but it has amplified the damage done by problems such as income inequality and labour market rigidities.

from Breakingviews:

Jumbo $6 bln bank IPO shows Saudi too big to miss

By Una Galani

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

Saudi Arabia’s jumbo bank offering shows the soon-to-open emerging market is too good to miss. The kingdom’s top lender by assets is planning to sell shares worth $6 billion, making it the biggest-ever initial public offering in the Middle East and second only to China’s Alibaba in the world this year. For most outsiders, it’s a reminder of the opportunities that will open up when foreign investors are granted direct access to the country’s $584 billion stock market next year.

from Breakingviews:

Chinese banks learn Western capital tricks

By Peter Thal Larsen

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Chinese banks are learning Western capital tricks. The country’s largest lenders have changed the way they measure the riskiness of their loans. For most, that has made capital ratios look healthier. It’s another reason to question Chinese banks’ balance sheets.

from Breakingviews:

BofA delivers good governance a kick in the teeth

By Antony Currie

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Bank of America has just delivered good governance a solid kick in the teeth. The mega-bank announced late Wednesday that its directors have voted to add the chairmanship to Brian Moynihan’s duties as chief executive. The move not only puts too much power in one person’s hands, it also reduces the position to little more than a perk to be granted or taken away, depending on performance.

from Breakingviews:

RBS puts lipstick on Citizens for $14 bln IPO

By Antony Currie

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. 

Royal Bank of Scotland is applying a fair amount of lipstick to its U.S. unit ahead of a planned initial public offering. Citizens Financial is worth up to $14 billion, based on the price range of $23 to $25 a share set on Sept. 8. Like the leaders of its home nation, RBS is painting too pretty a picture of life after independence.

from Breakingviews:

Why Citigroup would be better in bits

By Rob Cox

The author is a Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. 

Nine years ago, Breakingviews proposed an “extreme idea” to Citigroup’s then-leader Charles Prince. The $240 billion New York bank’s market capitalization was lower than the worth of its parts valued separately. By splitting into three separate units, the idea was, Prince could hand shareholders an extra $50 billion or so, the equivalent of one entire U.S. Bancorp at the time.

As it turned out, Citi had bigger concerns ahead. The housing crash exposed spectacular losses, wiping out capital and necessitating a government bailout. Prince was sent dancing onto the golf course. With the crisis now fairly distant in the rear-view mirror, however, it’s time for current Chief Executive Michael Corbat to revisit the case for a breakup.

from Breakingviews:

Review: A pained call for radical financial reform

By Edward Hadas

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

Martin Wolf is still recovering from the financial crisis. In his new book, the Financial Times economics commentator admits to being surprised at the depth, breadth and length of the economic malaise which followed the near collapse of the global financial system in 2008.

from Breakingviews:

S&P 500 at 2,000 invites “new normal” thinking

By Martin Hutchinson

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Beware new paradigms. The S&P 500 Index’s first trades above 2,000 on Monday invite the idea of a new normal in markets. The price-to-earnings ratio is under 20, only moderately above average, and interest rates remain low. But U.S. earnings are at a peak relative to GDP. Assume they adjust back to the long-term norm, and the stock benchmark would be a third lower.

from Breakingviews:

Ushering Eric Cantor to revolving door

By Rob Cox

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

The following is a fictional letter that could be circulated in the corridors of K Street, the canyons of Wall Street and the hedgerows of the Hamptons this summer:

from The Great Debate UK:

Financing must improve if UK auto sector is to thrive

--Guy Walsh is Regional Director at ABN AMRO Commercial Finance PLC. The opinion expressed are his own.--

The automotive industry is the UK’s largest sector in terms of exports, generating around £30 billion of annual revenue, but many smaller players in the sector languish due to a lack of funding.

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