from Breakingviews:

Review: The secret cause of economic crises

By Guest Contributor
November 7, 2014

By Edward Chancellor

The author is a guest columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

What is the glue which holds an economy together? Disciples of Adam Smith would argue that self-interest serves as the organising principle. The problem with this way of thinking is that it overlooks the fact that man is not an island unto himself. He is a social animal, who must have constant dealings with other people. Besides, according to John Maynard Keynes, it is impossible to pursue our self-interest rationally, because we don’t have enough information to make probabilistic judgments about the future. Instead, we must rely on irrational animal spirits as a spur to action.

from MacroScope:

Post-Lehman shadows creeping up on German economy again?

October 10, 2014

Germany's Minister of Finance Wolfgang Schauble speaks during a discussion during the World Bank/IMF annual meetings in Washington

The recent stretch of dire economic data from Germany is starting to bear an unfortunate resemblance to late 2008 – when Lehman Brothers collapsed and the world tipped into the worst recession since the Great Depression.

from Breakingviews:

Asset price disinflation may be next big thing

By Edward Hadas
October 6, 2014

By Edward Hadas

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Breakingviews:

Capital crisis making Italy SpA stronger

July 10, 2014

By Rob Cox

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Breakingviews:

Future financiers condemned to repeat sins of past

June 7, 2014

By Jeffrey Goldfarb

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Nicholas Wapshott:

Yellen shows her hand

By Nicholas Wapshott
April 19, 2014

The difference between the Federal Reserve Board of Chairwoman Janet Yellen and that of her immediate predecessor Ben Bernanke is becoming clear. No more so than in their approach to the problem of joblessness.

from Expert Zone:

The reform club

By Paul Donovan
April 15, 2014

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

That custodian of the English language, the Oxford English Dictionary, describes a bubble as “anything fragile, unsubstantial, empty or worthless; a deceptive show”. Could this description apply to the current frenzy for “reform” that is seemingly sweeping the global economy? The answer is “yes, in part”. While there are some genuine attempts at reform, market expectations for reform will inevitably be disappointed in some parts of the world.

from Breakingviews:

Jamie Dimon hits final stage of grief: acceptance

April 10, 2014

By Rob Cox
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from The Great Debate:

Are banks too big to indict?

By Charles R. Morris
January 24, 2014

The great 19th century English jurist, Sir James Fitzjames Stephens, once wrote that murderers were hung not for reasons of revenge or deterrence -- but to underscore what a serious breach of the social compact had been committed.

from Unstructured Finance:

Jim Chanos, bad news bear, urges market prudence

By Jennifer Ablan
December 9, 2013

Prominent short-seller Jim Chanos is probably one of the last true “bad news bears” you will find on Wall Street these days, save for Jim Grant and Nouriel Roubini. Almost everywhere you turn, money managers still are bullish on U.S. equities going into 2014 even after the Standard & Poor’s 500’s 27 percent returns year-to-date and the Nasdaq is back to levels not seen since the height of the dot-com bubble in 1999.