from Breakingviews:

Money-for-nothing idea will survive Swiss rebuff

June 6, 2016

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

from Breakingviews:

“Because it’s France” no basis for EU budget rules

June 1, 2016

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own. 

from Breakingviews:

Illinois governor all but summons bond vigilantes

May 17, 2016

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. 

from Breakingviews:

Congress punts gas tax hike in favor of bank raid

December 3, 2015

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. 

from Breakingviews:

Hefty ECB rate cut might do more harm than good

November 10, 2015

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

from Breakingviews:

Rob Cox: The world’s hardest central bank job

By Rob Cox
July 16, 2015

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Breakingviews:

UK blithely signs up to Germany’s worst idea

June 10, 2015

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Breakingviews:

India’s infrastructure push could be envy of West

March 2, 2015

By Andy Mukherjee

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from MacroScope:

Brazil’s GDP outlook for 2015 gets slashed again. But is it low enough?

January 16, 2015

Brazil's Finance Minister Joaquim Levy, pictured through a red LED light of a camera, reacts during a news conference at Brazil's Central Bank in BrasiliaMarket forecasts for Brazil's economic growth this year have been falling steadily for months, reaching a meager 0.5 percent in Reuters latest quarterly poll published on Thursday. One year ago, a similar survey predicted growth of 2.5 percent in 2015.

from Anatole Kaletsky:

The takeaway from six years of economic troubles? Keynes was right.

October 31, 2014

Protesters clash with police during an anti-austerity rally in Athens

Now that the Federal Reserve has brought its program of quantitative easing to a successful conclusion, while the French and German governments have ended their shadow-boxing over European budget “rules,” macroeconomic policy all over the world is entering a period of unusual stability and predictability. Rightly or wrongly, the main advanced economies have reached a settled view on their economic policy choices and are very unlikely to change these in the year or two ahead, whether they succeed or fail. It therefore seems appropriate to consider what we can learn from all the policy experiments conducted around the world since the 2008 crisis.