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from Photographers' Blog:

Portugal’s love affair with canned fish

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Lisbon, Portugal

By Jose Manuel Ribeiro

Canned fish: poor people's food, gourmet cuisine, souvenir or just healthy fast food?

It was late when I arrived home, tired and starving. I opened the kitchen cupboard looking for some late-night lazy-man food, and there, they were: my friendly and colorful fish cans.

My oldest memory of canned fish brings me back to primary school when both children and teachers were asked to bring basic food that could be packed in boxes to send to starving people in the south of Nigeria during the Biafra war in the late sixties. I had not seen that many cans of fish together in my life since that day, until I visited a factory.

Canned fish was always a part of my family picnics along the Tagus river or on the seacoast beaches. I also discovered them later on, included in my army survival kit. It was like a piece of home amid that hostile environment.

from Photographers' Blog:

Behind the snakehead legend

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Mt. Vernon, Virginia

By Gary Cameron

Spending time on the water pursuing fish is one of my favorite, relaxing pastimes. Spending time on the water pursuing fish as part of my job comes in as a close second.

In a city that requires plenty of time having photographers covering men in suits behind microphones with lots of blah-blah-blah, going out on a Virginia Department of Game and Inland fisheries biologists “stunboat” for a day of chasing, capturing, monitoring, studying, dissecting and releasing the once-feared northern snakehead fish was an assignment I looked forward to.

from Photographers' Blog:

Fishing in Fukushima

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Hirono town, Fukushima prefecture, Japan

By Issei Kato

After some tough negotiations with local fishermen cooperatives I was allowed on board a fishing boat sailing out to check fish radioactive contamination levels in waters off the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Commercial fishing has been banned near the tsunami-crippled complex since the March 11, 2011 tsunami and earthquake disaster. The only fishing that still goes on is tied to contamination research carried out by small-scale fishermen contracted by the government. The fishermen set out to sea every two weeks remembering the good old days, as they seek to reestablish their livelihoods and anxiously hope they will be able to go back to full-time fishing again.

I began thinking about the best way to take as many versatile pictures as possible in a tough environment - on a tiny boat which is slippery and keeps rocking back and forth with waves of water splashing all over the bouncing deck. I was told that the fishermen were going to use gill nets which take up quite a bit of space on the deck. This spelled out more dangers and obstacles for my equipment and I, as I knew I would have to try hard not to get caught up in the nets or trip up and fall into the sea. I was worried that had I stepped on one of the nets I would get scolded by a gruff fishermen and the whole effort would be in vein because of my own thoughtlessness.

from Oddly Enough Blog:

More jumbo gumbo, Mr. President?

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Blog Guy, have you seen that amazing new book about former first lady Jacqueline Kennedy, the one taken from hours of taped interviews with her just months after her husband was assassinated?

I have, indeed. It's a must-read for anyone who likes fish soup.

Excuse me? Are we talking about the same book?

Sure. I'm not even finished with it, and already I'm struck by her vivid chowder memories of Jack Kennedy:

from Oddly Enough Blog:

Staying longer with a monger?

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Blog Guy, it seemed to me that Britain's Prince William and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, really had to do some silly stuff on their long trip to Canada.

I mean, cowboy hats, a stagecoach, canoes, stuff like that.

Don't worry about William and Catherine. At least they managed to avoid visiting fishmongers, which is the worst royal duty there is.

from Oddly Enough Blog:

Then the queen says to this fishmonger…

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I say, my good man, are you the local fishmonger?

You've come to the right plaice, your majesty. I'm the o-fish-al monger!

Well, I must say, there is a vile odor here!

You smelt something bad? Say, did you come to carp, or are you here just for the halibut? Get it? Halibut? I got a million of 'em!

One gathers you must be some sort of village simpleton, laughing at jokes such as those.

from FaithWorld:

UK Catholics urged to shun meat on Fridays

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(Fish and chips in London, 31 July 2010/Javier Vte Rejas)

Britain's Catholics have been urged to make more effort to follow religious custom and abstain from eating meat on Fridays, potentially boosting sales of fish.

Church law required Catholics over the centuries to comply with this abstinence as part of Friday penance, the day set aside for special prayer and fasting to mark the day Jesus died. Traditionally Catholics have opted to eat fish instead, though a combination of new church guidance and changing eating habits has eroded this habit.

from Environment Forum:

Who is responsible for cleaning up our oceans?

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OIL-RIG/LEAK

-- David Rockefeller, Jr. is a philanthropist and CEO of Around the Americas and Chairman of Sailors for the Sea. Any views expressed here are his own. --

When the Ocean Watch set sail from Seattle last May at the launch of our Around the Americas expedition, our greatest challenge was to make Americans start thinking about health of oceans. For too long, we have been taking our rich seafood supplies and scenic seascapes for granted.

from Environment Forum:

So long, sardines? Lake Tanganyika hasn’t been this warm in 1,500 years

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lake_tanganyika1_hEast Africa's Lake Tanganyika might be getting too hot for sardines.

The little fish have been an economic and nutritional mainstay for some 10 million people in neighboring Burundi, Tanzania, Zambia and the Democratic Republic of Congo -- four of the poorest countries on Earth. They also depend on Lake Tanganyika for drinking water.

But that could change, according to research published in the online version of the journal Nature Geoscience. Using samples of the lakebed that chart a 1,500-year history of the lake's surface water temperature, the scientists found the current temperature -- 78.8 degrees F (26 degrees C) -- is the warmest it's been in a millennium and a half. And that could play havoc with sardines and other fish the local people depend on.

from Oddly Enough Blog:

Who ordered the cream of bream?

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I swear, some days it seems like all I do is settle bets for people. Everybody wants Blog Guy to judge their stupid bar bets, just because I have access to lavish media resources all over the world.

JAPAN/

"Bob," a reader writes in, "please settle a bet I have with my great-grandmother. In a fight between a sumo wrestler and a fish, who would win?"

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